To the Editor:

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Oct 252006
 
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Another Burqa Perspective

Here is a Christian perspective on the ever-contested burqa.

Besides the fact that whenever I’m presented with a religious symbol or practice not found in my own religion, I start foaming at the mouth and pawing the ground like any righteous fundamentalist (joking!!), I’m actually okay with the burqa…for the most part.

For one thing, the burqa is a symbol of modesty. Just check out Fulla (on Wikipedia), the Muslim version of Barbie. She’s modest, nice to her friends, wears classy clothes indoors and doesn’t double as a hooker on weekends. Also, I know that some women (some not even Muslim) wear the burqa to dispel unwanted attention from males; why then, is it socially acceptable for attention-hungry women to wear immodest clothing in public and the population does not complain?

Oh, I get it-because we’re visual gluttons.

On the other hand, I don’t believe in hate crimes-for anyone. No one should be hurt, ridiculed, shamed, mutilated or killed for their attempts to live a peaceful life. “No one” includes people of all religions, sexual orientations, skin colors, etc. Therefore, if a woman chooses not to wear a burqa in a community where it is generally accepted as good to do so, then she should NOT have to suffer pain and suffering for those choices, especially at the hands of those who she should be able to trust, like her family. If this action (or any questionable action in a community) is indeed thought of as incendiary, then some spiritual leader should talk with them about their choices, see if they can do anything to help them, and move on from there.

The burqa is only a symbol of oppression to those who are oppressed by it. From what I’ve seen so far, it is often a choice.

So there you have it. I wish that we women could be free to be modest if we so choose, but not to the detriment of our spirit or being. Though, I’m not about to storm England (or anywhere else, for that matter) demanding that all burqas come off. That is not my right, no matter how I may feel about it.

Liz Bartlett

junior

art

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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To the Editor:

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Oct 252006
 
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Ashamed to be Greek?

After reading the articles in the Collegian Monday morning, I felt ashamed to be a Greek. Not because one of our longest standing chapters, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, was kicked off of campus, but because the president of another chapter, Alpha Gamma Rho, chose to make comments about the fallen fraternity that were neither appropriate nor considerate. Being a part of Greek life on the Colorado State campus, or any other campus for that matter, is about embracing a special brotherhood and sisterhood, that not only exists in each individual chapter, but throughout the system as a whole. As the president of AGR verbally attacked the reputation of SAE he not only made himself and his fraternity look foolish, but the Greek system as a whole. If we can’t even stand together in this time, why stand at all? Partying, underage drinking,

and other infractions happen at all places on campus, not just in the Greek system, and not just in the SAE fraternity. Bad decisions are made everywhere, and it is unfortunate that such blame and publicity has to fall on the SAEs and on the Greek system. If Greek life is going to thrive on campus once again, we must stand together to raise our standards. Belittling one another will only continue to bring the system down.

Lauren Lasater

freshman

technical journalism

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the Editor:

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Oct 252006
 
Authors:

Vote Paccione? I think not…

I am writing this letter in response to the Collegian’s joint opinion column on Wednesday, “Ditch Musgrave, vote Paccione.” While I disagree with many of the votes Representative Musgrave has cast, the Collegian is wrong to imply that opposing Referendum C supports draconian cuts to higher education. I personally voted against the referendum because there was very little discussion as to how the money was going to be put to use after its passage.

I believe the Collegian oversimplified this law and then conveniently used it to rebuke Representative Musgrave. I doubt the Collegian considered that one could support increasing funding to higher education while opposing the passage of Referendum C. Personally, I would gladly pay higher taxes to support higher education, but also support the Tax Payer’s Bill Of Rights (TABOR). Does that mean I have no business representing CSU? Before anyone takes the Collegian’s opinion as a valid criterion in their ballot decision, I recommend visiting www.vote-smart.org. This Web site will show Representative Musgrave’s voting history in its entirety.

Oh, and please vote Libertarian.

Eric Olsen

2nd bachelor’s candidate

political science

 Posted by at 5:00 pm