To the Editor:

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Oct 222006
 
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Angry column short on facts

Ryan Speaker, your article in Wednesday’s Collegian contained little fact and lots of anger, but I guess that’s why we’re on the opinion page. First, you say that Christians try to shame atheists, yet the tone of your article was shaming me as a Christian for not being an atheist.

You say that all we need is one book and a little faith, but all you need is evidence. The reason you think your evidence is correct is because you have faith that it is correct, and I have faith that God is correct. I’m not angry at you for having faith in something I don’t, so why are you angry at me for having faith in something you don’t?

“Is there ever a good time to admit being an atheist?” Not with your attitude. If you persist on labeling Christians as condescending, shaming, and dishonest because you’ve had a bad experience with a few of us, all you’re doing is inspiring negativity.

Luke Outwater

Senior

Mathematics

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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To the Editor:

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Oct 222006
 
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Speaker condescending toward Christians

Ryan Speaker provided his view on the dilemma of atheists in Wednesday’s paper, writing that it’s tough to be someone not associated with a particular ‘faith’ in a vaguely Christian nation. While I understand some of his views, I find it hard to commiserate with him, on the basis that, while some of the quotes from Christians he has are indeed quite condescending, so are some of his comments toward them.

As a firm believer in a sort of ‘spectrum of faith,’ I know what Mr. Speaker means when he says that atheists “as a group are so diverse.” I think that every one of us has a place somewhere on that spectrum, even Ryan Speaker. However, to say that respecting someone’s faith is the same as giving “cover for religious extremists,” is to generalize and narrow the viewpoints of some of the moderately religious out there.

Being a Unitarian-Universalist myself, I have a hard time thinking of a reason not to respect someone’s faith, but I also have a hard time finding a reason to justify the actions that sometimes come from that faith; just because I respect the Catholic faith, doesn’t mean I respect some of their members’ actions during the Holocaust.

Along the same lines, however, though I respect those on the other side of the spectrum and appreciate their desire to have evidence to back their viewpoint, it sure is tough to be called ‘dishonest’ and ‘illogical,’ even if the latter was used humorously. On reading Malaclypse the Yonger’s Principia Discordia, I came across a diagram that showed how both constructive order and constructive disorder were both better than destructive order and disorder. The same could apply to faith and religion: constructive faith and constructive science (for lack of a better term) are both better than the destructive sides of either.

Matt Scott

Sophomore, music education

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the editor:

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Oct 222006
 
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This is concerning the poll question in Friday’s newspaper: “If you could stab any football player and get away with it, who would it be?”

I just want to start off by saying that in my opinion, it is completely unacceptable to make a mockery of such situations that reflect the underlying and hidden problems in America. Along with that, people’s sickness to turn it into a playful matter. I feel that this inclusion in the article was not needed and was childish on the part of the Collegian. Surely there’s more creativity on you staff.

Chantel Reed

Junior, sociology

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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Oct 222006
 
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Vote Paccione

My husband Larry and I had the rewarding experience of canvassing unaffiliated voters in Fort Collins’ City Park Neighborhood. Their responses were almost unanimously in support of Angie and included:

“Angie is more in tune with the needs of CD4 citizens.”

“I am a single mom, and I want a representative who understands my struggles.”

“I don’t care about Angie’s past financial problems. The past is the past. It is more important that she overcame and learned from them.” (Marilyn Musgrave’s votes have contributed to an $8.5 trillion national debt and have given tax breaks to the wealthiest 1 percent.)

“I personally know Marilyn Musgrave, and I am voting for Angie.”

“I am tired of the negative ads that flash on my TV from the Musgrave campaign.”

The Denver Post recommends you vote for Angie, and we do, too! Paccione works with all sides to get legislation passed. She understands the needs of minorities. Angie will work for research-based methods to improve education. She sponsored legislation to catch human smugglers and employers who hire illegal immigrants. She will work for RMNP wilderness designation, American energy independence, and lower drug costs from companies. Vote Paccione.

Margie Caswell, retired educator

Red Feather Lakes

 Posted by at 5:00 pm