To the Editor:

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Oct 022006
 
Authors:

Focus of the University

The article “Protests expected during Zedillo visit” printed in the

Collegian on Thursday contains the following quote from Jennifer Dimas, a CSU spokeswoman:

“Ernesto Zedillo was selected because of his renowned expertise in globalization and emerging markets. Globalization and the global economy are focuses of the university.”

Am I naive and old fashioned in believing that education, academic research and the exchange of ideas (not a right wing imperialist political agenda) should be the focus of a university?

Am I naive in believing that, if any political agenda at all should be a focus of the university, it should be something like the First Amendment, which CSU has violated both in restricting the Zedillo protest unnecessarily and banning the Marijuana Initiative flyers (and then apparently lying about it) just this past week?

Shame on the administration of CSU.

Let’s get back on track with the business of academic education and research.

Sandy Lemberg

Bellvue resident

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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To the Editor

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Oct 022006
 
Authors:

Honestly, Lets Be Smart

I have been profoundly disappointed in the Collegian’s repeated feeble attempts at being intelligent. Monday was a shining example, where the opinion section sported Andy Nicewicz’s supremely self-defeating article about abortion. There is not enough paper to devote to this issue in its entirety, so I will just deal with a couple of the vital errors in logic and reason that were made.

First of all, the statement “It’s a moral issue, not a political one” assumes (falsely) that the two are separate. Statistically, as a nation we have always favored political leaders who have strong moral convictions and subsequently stand by them.

This begs the question: Without moral convictions in our politicians, would we as thinking Americans still vote for them? Think about it. Think in terms of whys, hows and why nots. This is termed “critical thinking.” I argue that moral convictions and political issues have historically gone hand in hand, and without that relationship, we as a country would be in a world of hurt.

Second of all, Mr. Nicewicz seems to be, well, more like blatantly is suggesting, that citing “some science-based information” is not, in fact, a valid form of argument. What does hold weight in an intelligent argument, however, is something along these lines: “That thing doesn’t look like a baby, so its not one. Keep God out of my business.”

Mr. Nicewicz, I’m sorry to inform you that people ARE occasionally “swayed” by factual and scientific information.

Now I will discuss the purpose of having an opinion. First, the goal is for the opinion to be an educated and informed one. If this is accomplished, then it can be used to engage in healthy debate (not screaming obscenities and blasting the opposing person’s character).

Healthy and intelligent debate is constructive because it sparks critical thinking and the search for answers. This quality is severely lacking in post-modern society.

In closing, when confronted with a tough issue, I challenge not only the Collegian, but all its readers to: 1) think, 2) research, then 3) develop a firm, factually based opinion and stand by it. Please do not, under any circumstances, begin with an uninformed opinion and be apathetic enough to end there.

Sarah Scott

junior

human development and family studies major

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the Editor

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Oct 022006
 
Authors:

Amendment 44 supported by the Bible

We’re indebted to Mason Tvert and his work, re-legalizing cannabis in my lifetime (Pot Fliers Flap Shrouded in Haze, Sept. 28, 2006), placing Amendment 44 on Colorado’s election ballot Nov. 7.

This is a chance for citizens to change an ignorant, anti-Christian law. It is a chance for parents and mothers to help protect children from prohibitionist society and its harms. A chance to guide police toward serving and protecting, rather than maintaining a misguided prohibition.

A chance for true conservatives to stop government from unsuccessfully spending more money to control what people put in their bodies. A chance for DARE graduates who’ve been lied to to speak out. And it’s a chance for Christians to acknowledge what it means when Christ God Our Father indicates He created all the seed-bearing plants saying they are all good on literally the very first page of the Bible (see Genesis 1:11-12 and 29-30).

It’s time to stop caging and persecuting people for using what God says is good.

Stan White

Dillon resident

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the Editor

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Oct 022006
 
Authors:

Hookah is more harmful than you think

I recently read an article in the Collegian about the new hookah bars popping up around town. I was disappointed to see that none of the dangers of hookah smoking were presented in this article.

As a student, I know many of my peers are under the false impression that smoking hookah is a safer alternative to smoking cigarettes. For example, in another recent article in the Corbett Hall newsletter, a resident assistant says, “If you think that hookah is unhealthy, I would argue that the health benefits of the relaxation counter the disadvantages of the smoke. I’ve convinced myself, and until I see scientific proof to the contrary, I will continue to smoke.”

Many students believe hookahs are less addictive, that they have fewer toxins and they are mostly just “herbs.” These are completely untrue and I feel the student body needs to know all the dangers of hookah smoke.

According to the Food and Chemical Toxicology, hookah smoke produces nearly 100 times more “tar” than cigarette smoke. In the Journal of Pakistan Medical Association, it states that even after it is passed through water, the smoke contains high levels of toxic compounds, including carbon monoxide, heavy metals and cancer-causing carcinogens.

The World Health Organization states that a typical one-hour long waterpipe smoking session involves inhaling 100 to 200 times the volume of smoke inhaled with a single cigarette. Also, because the mouthpiece is generally shared among many people, there is a high risk of transmitting communicable diseases including tuberculosis and hepatitis.

I feel CSU students need to know the dangers of smoking hookah, especially since many of them feel they are participating in a “safer” alternative. It’s very important students know the risks and also I think many students, such as the Corbett RA, would be surprised about the facts of hookah smoking.

Susana Mendez

senior

technical journalism

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the Editor

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Oct 022006
 
Authors:

The Party of Torture

The U.S. Congress recently passed a bill that will grant the president vast power. According to an editorial in The New York Times, the bill gives the president the power to detain anyone at any time, indefinitely, effectively eliminating due process and habeus corpus when it’s not convenient. The president will also have the power to redefine the Geneva Conventions as he sees fit, likely allowing for “what normal people would consider torture.” The Supreme Court also has no power to review any of this, thanks to the bill.

Since we are a country of laws and not men, one would think this type of bill might have trouble getting through our legislature. Indeed, during the debate, Sen. Arlen Specter, R-Pa., said the bill “sends us back 900 years because it denies habeas corpus rights and allows the president to detain people indefinitely.” Then he voted for it. The bill passed the Senate by vote of 65-43, mostly along party lines.

A couple of years ago, Al Gore gave a speech discussing security, and in it he discussed the way Israel’s highest court dealt with the subject of balancing rights and security. Here is what they said:

“This is the destiny of democracy, as not all means are acceptable to it, and not all practices employed by its enemies are open before it. Although a democracy must often fight with one hand tied behind its back, it nonetheless has the upper hand. Preserving the Rule of Law and recognition of an individual’s liberty constitutes an important component in its understanding of security. At the end of the day they (add to) its strength.”

In November, it seems the choice is clear: Torture or taxes. If you like torture, vote Republican. If you like taxes, vote Democrat. If you don’t like either one, don’t vote at all.

Bryan Stanford

senior

economics

 Posted by at 5:00 pm