To the Editor

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Sep 122006
 
Authors:

Question Leaders

“For those of you who still refuse to stand behind our president and our troops, please feel free to stand in front of them.” Thus Mark Reinholtz responded (in his Sept. 12 letter to the editor) to the Collegian editorial board’s criticism of the Bush administration in Monday’s Our View. Mark, is wishing death upon those you disagree with really consistent with the America you want to live in? To me, it seems more consistent with the close-minded brutality of the fundamentalist terrorists we are supposed to be fighting. Americans on the political left have many legitimate criticisms of this administration, including its hypocritical (and underreported) lack of physical, logistical, and medical support for our troops. Why not challenge your notion that Bush is one of our “best presidents yet,” and Google some of these criticisms? This is a college newspaper, and we’re living in a world that has deadly complexities and nuances. If the best discussion we can muster consists only of variations on the theme of “go jump in a lake,” then we’ve already lost the benefits of freedom of speech and expression. Think about this the next time Bush, Rumsfeld, Cheney or Rice insist that critics of the Iraq war are “aiding the enemy.” An America in which we cannot question those who use deadly force in our names is no longer the America that the framers of the Constitution envisioned.

Joe Fass

former postdoc in biochemistry and molecular biology, 2003-05

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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To the Editor

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Sep 122006
 
Authors:

Well let me start out by saying that you’ve taken what the Collegian said about the media and 9/11 way out of context. I’m sure that the Collegian editorial board does not feel insulted that the media is remembering the innocent people who lost their lives

Sept. 11, 2001, but rather, insulted that stations like ABC would make a mini-series out of this tragedy. I agree that the people who died five years ago in that horrible act should be remembered always but that doesn’t mean that their story should be turned into a drama to make some television network more money or boost Republican support.

While you’re obviously very pro-Bush and pro-media(?), even you should be able to see the difference in remembering and profiting.

On another note, the fact that you say President Bush is one of the best presidents of all time proves your ignorance. You say he is “one of the best presidents yet who actually had the courage and initiative to stand up and fight for our country and it’s citizens…”. Do you realize that Iraq and Saddam had NOTHING to do with the attacks of 9/11?!

What are we fighting for then? Are we fighting for the right to be free, to pass our values (or should I say the president’s values) onto other people across the world? Well what are our values, to live free, for everyone to be equal? How can we go fighting in other countries for freedom if we aren’t truly free here, in the United States? How can you stand up for a president who is against simple but important things like gay rights? We are not truly free here in America so we should NOT be pushing our faux-freedom on other people. You say that we need to honor the more than 2,000 lives that were lost on Sept. 11 and we should be fighting for those innocent people. Well there have been more than 100,000 reported Iraqi civilian deaths since our military intervention. Are our 2,000 lives more important than their 100,000?

We are young and we have the power to change things for the better but we need everyone (including people with views similar to yourself) to read between the lines. You must understand that the war we are fighting is an impossible war. We will never get rid of every terrorist and the fact that we have caused so many innocent deaths in our pursuit of terrorists should be a sign that we need to do something different. The very thing we are trying to fight (i.e. innocent lives lost by radical people) we are in reality creating. We have done more harm than good. I will end with a quote from Zen monk Thich Nhat Hanh:

“The root of terrorism should be identified so that it can be removed. The root of terrorism is misunderstanding, hatred, and violence. This root cannot be located by the military. Bombs and missiles cannot reach it, let alone destroy it. Only with the practice of calming and looking deeply can our insight reveal and identify this root. Only with the practice of deep listening and compassion can it be transformed and removed.”

Loren Toth

junior

mechanical engineer major

 Posted by at 5:00 pm