To the Editor:

 Uncategorized
Sep 142005
 
Authors:

Certain facts about Hurricane Katrina and relief efforts have been overlooked in recent letters in this paper. For example, some writers seem to have overlooked the fact that individuals in New Orleans actually shot at the relief workers. Rival gangs were having gun fights in the streets. Doctors and nurses could not even evacuate the sick and injured because of all the violence in New Orleans immediately following the hurricane. I find this behavior among Americans to be embarrassing. After the tidal wave in India and Indonesia last December, the gangs had the good sense to call a cease fire to work together for the good of the community.

I'm also embarrassed at the looting. It seems that the term "looting" needs defining because some CSU students have a mistaken understanding about what constitutes looting. Taking food and clean water, the basic necessities of life, can certainly be overlooked. Flat screen TVs and X-Boxes aren't necessary for human survival and taking them is looting. It's downright stealing.

Finally, I'm embarrassed at the response of all three levels of government. (Or perhaps I should say lack of response.) There's no disagreement that the federal government did a poor job of providing emergency assistance. So did the local and state governments. And yet the mayor of New Orleans and the governor of Louisiana are quick to point fingers of blame at the federal government. This behavior on the part of state and city officials provides an interesting contrast in the study of leadership. Compare Mayor Rudolph Giuliani in New York after 9/11 with the mayor of New Orleans.

The fact is that local government, as the level of government closest to the daily lives of people, is always the first responder in a disaster situation. They are also responsible for planning for disasters. A hurricane like Katrina had been predicted for many years. State and local governments knew that a category-5 hurricane was a threat that could occur one day.

One would think a city that lies at an elevation lower than sea level would have planned for such an eventuality. The local government had plenty of warning that this hurricane was coming and they were completely unprepared to help their citizens. In fact, more than two hundred school busses could have been used to help the poorest residents of the community evacuate the ravages of a hurricane that was predicted for several days. Rather, the city of New Orleans took no action and allowed those school busses to become inundated with floodwater. Smart state and local officials would have used those school busses, or at least have moved them to higher ground in anticipation of what was predicted to be a category 5 hurricane. They also would have had the Superdome stocked with food, water and medical supplies, and they failed in that as well.

All levels of government, state, federal and local, failed to come to the aid of its citizens. And Congress just passed emergency legislation allocating $50 billion plus to the federal government for cleanup? You'd think we'd learn.

Dan Wonstolen

Sophomore

Health and Exercise Science

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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To the Editor:

 Uncategorized  Add comments
Sep 142005
 
Authors:

Certain facts about Hurricane Katrina and relief efforts have been overlooked in recent letters in this paper. For example, some writers seem to have overlooked the fact that individuals in New Orleans actually shot at the relief workers. Rival gangs were having gun fights in the streets. Doctors and nurses could not even evacuate the sick and injured because of all the violence in New Orleans immediately following the hurricane. I find this behavior among Americans to be embarrassing. After the tidal wave in India and Indonesia last December, the gangs had the good sense to call a cease fire to work together for the good of the community.

I'm also embarrassed at the looting. It seems that the term "looting" needs defining because some CSU students have a mistaken understanding about what constitutes looting. Taking food and clean water, the basic necessities of life, can certainly be overlooked. Flat screen TVs and X-Boxes aren't necessary for human survival and taking them is looting. It's downright stealing.

Finally, I'm embarrassed at the response of all three levels of government. (Or perhaps I should say lack of response.) There's no disagreement that the federal government did a poor job of providing emergency assistance. So did the local and state governments. And yet the mayor of New Orleans and the governor of Louisiana are quick to point fingers of blame at the federal government. This behavior on the part of state and city officials provides an interesting contrast in the study of leadership. Compare Mayor Rudolph Giuliani in New York after 9/11 with the mayor of New Orleans.

The fact is that local government, as the level of government closest to the daily lives of people, is always the first responder in a disaster situation. They are also responsible for planning for disasters. A hurricane like Katrina had been predicted for many years. State and local governments knew that a category-5 hurricane was a threat that could occur one day.

One would think a city that lies at an elevation lower than sea level would have planned for such an eventuality. The local government had plenty of warning that this hurricane was coming and they were completely unprepared to help their citizens. In fact, more than two hundred school busses could have been used to help the poorest residents of the community evacuate the ravages of a hurricane that was predicted for several days. Rather, the city of New Orleans took no action and allowed those school busses to become inundated with floodwater. Smart state and local officials would have used those school busses, or at least have moved them to higher ground in anticipation of what was predicted to be a category 5 hurricane. They also would have had the Superdome stocked with food, water and medical supplies, and they failed in that as well.

All levels of government, state, federal and local, failed to come to the aid of its citizens. And Congress just passed emergency legislation allocating $50 billion plus to the federal government for cleanup? You'd think we'd learn.

Dan Wonstolen

Sophomore

Health and Exercise Science

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the Editor:

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Sep 142005
 
Authors:

Not only was I disappointed with Megan Schulz's column, "Earn Back Your Tuition", in Tuesday's paper, but I was outright disgusted.

What true Ram would actually bet against their own team? In the column, Schulz makes a comment about how Ram fans should be rewarded with a win. The fact is if you were a true Ram fan you would stick by your team through good times as well as bad times. A true fan wouldn't bet against their own team!

You ask for a winning season yet you're betting against the team, probably not the best move to help boost the team's morale. We've only had two games and none of them have even been conference games and Ms. Schulz is already assuming the team is going to have a losing season. Just because you get off on the wrong foot doesn't mean everything is going to go that way.

Apparently Ms. Schulz doesn't know how many winning seasons and bowl appearances we have had since the great Sonny Lubick came to CSU. And how can you say that betting against your own team doesn't mean you are rooting against them? That would mean you would be throwing your money away on a game if you actually wanted them to win. Sounds to me like Ms. Schulz has about as much Ram spirit as the little "Brass Buffaloes" that live down the road. Maybe she should transfer; she would fit right in.

Katherine Mangold

Senior, technical journalism

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the Editor:

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Sep 142005
 
Authors:

I am writing this letter in response to what is being said about CSU Greek Life. There have been several outrageous letters to the editor. With clever headlines such as "Greeks Busted" and "Bruzin for Boozin," I understand it makes it hard for anyone to form anything but a negative image of us. But judging from the pathetically written recent letters to the editor, it is clear to me some of the students have absolutely no idea what they are talking about when it comes to Greek Life.

Yes, I acknowledge we made a mistake a few weeks ago when we participated in "Rise and Ralph." But are those grounds for completely disregarding everything we do and everything we work for? I feel sorry for those of you that need to rely on stereotypes to form judgments on something of which you know nothing about.

Let me enlighten you. We, as a Greek system, have raised over $200,000 in the past four years for St. Jude's Hospital through our Up Til Dawn program. We, as a Greek system, had a higher GPA last spring, not to mention the past couple years, than the CSU student average. We, as a Greek system, create programs such as GASA (Greeks Against Sexual Assault) and ZOE (our Greek spiritual club) to generate awareness on such topics. We, as a Greek system, have our own Leadership Honor Society, Order of Omega. Not to mention the thousands of dollars we raise and the dozens of fundraisers we hold among our own individual chapters.

Gee, you know, I just honestly don't know how we all could achieve these great accomplishments if all we do is drink. We obviously have no "test of wit, moral strength or academic commitment." You call Greek Life an embarrassment?

What's embarrassing is that this university accepts students that are so ignorant and closed minded. Next time you write a letter, I challenge you to think outside the box and think about something other than what the press feeds you. I challenge you to research and get your facts straight before you speak so confidently on topics you know nothing about.

Kellsey Meyer

Senior, psychology major

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the Editor:

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Sep 142005
 
Authors:

I would like to respond to Tuesday's column on Referendum C. The state's budget is not expanding rapidly out of control, as Rep. Kevin Lundberg seems to think. Colorado's budget was cut severely by the recession after 9/11, and because of Taxpayers Bill Of Rights (TABOR), has not been able to recuperate. Thus, the state is unable to provide the same services it did four years ago.

Rep. Lundberg also mentioned accounting adjustments that lessened the expected budget shortfalls. Unfortunately, most of those adjustments will only work once. The shortfall is very much still present.

He also states the money in the hands of individuals will strengthen the economy. There are a few issues with this notion.

First of all, the state will not reap much benefit from this supposed economic boost since the taxes that exceed the stunted budget will have to be refunded.

Secondly, a family receiving $3,000 over five years will not repair crumbling schools, buy textbooks, fund higher education, repair roads, provide Medicaid, pay government workers or provide countless other services that individuals cannot.

Our state has one of the lowest tax rates in the nation – even if the state keeps our refunds. Is it not worth a little extra money so that our children can receive a proper education, our roads can be kept in good repair, and our poor and disabled be provided for? I find it interesting the people who complain about taxes also seem to complain about bad roads, poor education, and budget cuts to their pet government programs. The money to furnish such services does not just fall from the sky. Think about it.

Michelle Keefer

Senior, microbiology student

 Posted by at 5:00 pm