Mar 232005
 
Authors: James Baetke

The ballots are in the mail and so are the candidate leaflets.

District 5 candidates Marty Tharp and Kelly Ohlson have both infiltrated city mailboxes with campaign leaflets promoting their platforms on why they should be part of the City Council in April's elections.

Below are profiles of each candidate and how he or she stands on the ballot issues and other concerns that directly affect the Fort Collins college population. The candidates are listed in alphabetical order by their last name.

Candidate: Kelly Ohlson

District: 5

Hometown: Cherokee, Iowa

Current Employer: Self-employed

Age: 54

Previous public office: 1983-1987 Councilmember, 1986-1987 Mayor

Are you in favor of:

Grocery repeal tax (ballot issue 1): No

Keeping fluoride out of the water (ballot issue 2): Yes

Road maintenance tax (ballot issue 3): Yes

Proposed police substation in the Campus West neighborhood: Neutral

Strong enforcement of the three-unrelated law as it stands today: No

Kelly Ohlson is back for more.

Already a Fort Collins mayor from 1986-1987 and part of the city council in the '80s, Ohlson wants to tackle problems that linger within the city limits and hang over council members' heads today.

"I think I have proved myself before," Ohlson said.

Ohlson said his stint on the council in the '80s is a perfect reason to elect him this time around.

Not only does the city need to appreciate industry, such as heavy-hitter Hewlett-Packard, to fuel the city, CSU has a huge impact as well.

"CSU is the largest employer and most influential organization in Fort Collins," said Ohlson, who is a graduate of CSU.

Although Ohlson is not running on specific issues, he said the city's budget is in trouble.

"We really have to take a serious look at the city's budget. It's not sexy but it's the biggest issue," Ohlson said.

Ohlson is pro-environment and has an extensive history in leading environmental ballot measures. Ohlson said he would like to see the city grow into a sustainable economy, which includes responsible development and annexation, but be able to still maintain clean air, water and open space.

 

 

Candidate: Marty Tharp

District: 5

Hometown: Livonia, Mich.

Current Employer: Retired CSU Professor

Age: 71

Previous public office: City Council District 5, One Term, former president of the Society of Professional Journalists

Are you in favor of?:

Grocery repeal tax (ballot issue 1): No

Keeping fluoride out of the water (ballot issue 2): Yes

Road maintenance tax (ballot issue 3): Yes

Proposed police substation in the Campus West neighborhood: Yes

Strong enforcement of the three-unrelated law as it stands today: Neutral

"As a former teacher I have dealt with students and worked with students for many years," said Marty Tharp, up for reelection in District 5. "I am aware of the number of students in my district."

Retired since 2000 as a professor in the CSU Department of Journalism and Technical Communication, Tharp said she realizes how important her district is to neighborhood issues such as the three-unrelated law.

"I will keep working toward solutions that are acceptable to everybody," Tharp said.

Being able to balance the needs of the community and the university is crucial, but Tharp said she does not necessarily lean on one side or the other; she just wants to be fair. She also would like to see a new city council that has variety and offers different viewpoints.

Tharp does not like the idea of running on platforms, but said she recognizes what needs to be done to improve City Council. She also refuted the fact that she runs on any kind of personal agenda in areas such as pro-growth and taxes. During her first term as District 5 council member, Tharp was often a swing vote, on the fence with many issues because she sorts issues independently, she said.

"I do not fit in comfortably in any labeled camp," Tharp said.

Tharp said in order for the city to grow within the established growth-management plan, it must be true to its agreement with the county to grow and annex when land becomes available.

"We have established a growth-management area about the size of Boston," Tharp said.

 Posted by at 6:00 pm

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