To the editor:

 Uncategorized
Mar 222005
 
Authors:

Allow me to add some perspective that it seems Andrea Matrich has missed in the Terri Schiavo case. Michael Schiavo is Terri's husband, and from the moment she passed into a persistent vegetative state, he has been her legal guardian.

The moment he divorces her, he loses that guardianship to her parents, giving them the power to act in a manner that is not consistent with what Michael (and the courts) have concluded that Terri wanted. The original court case showed that Michael was acting in accordance with what her wishes were regarding being kept alive in such a state. Appeal after appeal has backed up this original decision.

Spending 15 years of his life to fight for her wishes? Hardly selfish. Turning down a $1 million offer to give up this legal status? Hardly selfish. Putting up with the warped morality that would turn this into a right-to-life case and the moronic political posturing by our elected representatives in order to fight for his wife's wishes? Hardly selfish.

Let's not pretend that Schiavo is disabled in the sense that she's blind or paralyzed. She lacks the physical brain component that allows her to think or feel on any level, and it's not going to grow back. Asserting that pulling her off of the artificial life-sustaining system is akin to a visit from Dr. Kevorkian is a stretch. No one is advocating poisoning her, but merely removing equipment that has kept her body artificially alive for 15 years after her higher brain functions (everything that made her intrinsically human) ceased functioning forever.

 

Thomas Miller

Senior

Anthropology and History

 Posted by at 6:00 pm

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To the editor:

 Uncategorized  Add comments
Mar 222005
 
Authors:

Ms. Matich, in a Tuesday letter to the editor, states she thinks it's selfishness on Mr. Schiavo's part in making the decision he made. In my own individual family there are people I would want to make this decision for me and people who I wouldn't want to make this decisions for me. It's different for each family.

I don't know if parents should take precedent over spouses, siblings or children, but I do know who shouldn't be allowed to make this decision for me – the president, the governor, Congress and, most especially, the general public.

Some would say that nature (or God) made this decision when Mrs. Schiavo's heart stopped, and had humans not intervened she would have died. This brings up a whole other series of beliefs – how far should the medical community go in saving a life and quantity vs. quality of life. I also know there is only one person (besides nature or God) who should have a say and that's me (each individual person).

I think it was selfish of Mrs. Schiavo not to have made her wishes known – thus sparing her family from having to make the most agonizing decision a person will ever make. Right this very minute each person needs to make this decision for himself or herself and make sure his or her family knows what that decision is. Write it down and spare them the pain.

It's all about choice and beliefs – our own – no one else's. Most importantly it's about not foisting our beliefs on other people. This could be said about most issues (yes, we need laws to keep us safe), however, if we are truly walking our own path we don't have the right or the inclination to step onto someone else's path and tell them our way is better

Let this family alone and make the decision for yourself. And may Terri and her family finally find some peace.

Conni Succo

CSU Library Tech

 Posted by at 6:00 pm