To the editor:

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Feb 272005
 
Authors:

I find it sadly stereotypical that a person who holds a title like "vice president of the CSU College Republicans" would object when a non-Republican uses inflammatory language like "Enemy of America" to score cheap points. Unfounded, unsupported, inflammatory statements are mainstays of Republicanism (Remember "flip-flopper")? Yet I've never heard a Republican accept the tactic with humility when it's turned around.

But I'm off-topic. The reason I'm writing is to clarify some misunderstandings that many people seem to have. (1) The issue in the Ward Churchill scandal is not free speech but one specific tenet of it, academic freedom. The danger in firing a tenured professor over a controversy like this is that new ideas are hard to come by when people are punished for publishing unpopular ones (like suggesting that the earth is round).

(2) There has been a lot of rhetoric about "holding educators responsible" since they're paid with tax money. What that boils down to is that professors should reinforce mainstream opinions since they're tax-funded, and if you don't see why that's crippling you need more education.

(3) Ward Churchill's writings are not by definition anti-American. He suggests that terrorism is a foreseeable consequence of conducting ourselves the way we do, and while he is critical of many actions by the U.S. government and U.S.-owned business, I've never heard him condone terrorism.

Daniel Miles

Senior

Computer Science Major

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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To the editor:

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Feb 272005
 
Authors:

Justin Davis' letter to the editor stated, "Liberating 25 million is a bad thing to liberals in the USA." I don't know what a "liberal" is by Mr. Davis's opinion, but here is the opinion of a fellow U.S. citizen.

Sacrificing any part of the Bill of Rights is a bad thing. Invading a sovereign nation of 25 million under false pretences is a bad thing. Dramatically undermining the entire world's opinion of a nation is a bad thing. Threatening to invade another is a worse thing. Being regarded by the rest of the world as "a greater threat than Nazi Germany ever was" is a bad thing; the preceding news quote not printed in the United States. Warmongering is a bad thing, and attacking anyone's right to free speech is most definitely a bad thing under any circumstances.

All partisan politics aside, the country is at a climatic point in its history and this adolescent fighting between our country's only two major political parties will not solve any of the "real problems" any time soon. It is time to question this "truth," or the illusion thereof, that is projected on us by major media and seek some real answers to the real problems facing this country. We as American citizens are in the most unique position in the world. We alone have an enormous ability to really change how the world operates. While we argue about a professor's tenure, the rest of the world, including our allies, are scrambling around to protect themselves from the world's No. 1 threat, namely us.

 

Patrick Hume

Senior Biochemistry

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the editor:

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Feb 272005
 
Authors:

I am writing in response to Jesse McLain's column on Thursday. Jesse objected to Campus Feminist Alliance's V-day video clips on the Lory Student Center Plaza saying, "everyone knows rape is wrong, but blatantly broadcasting those videos didn't help anyone and it may have disturbed many." I'm afraid this writer missed the point.

Those film clips were all taken from mainstream movies; the point is that we should be disturbed by the fact that there are so many of them, but we aren't. Sure, everyone knows that rape is wrong, but it still happens to women every day. CFA is trying to make a point of how ubiquitous depictions of violence against women really are.

Kendra Wiig

Senior

Speech communication major

 Posted by at 5:00 pm