To the editor:

 Uncategorized
Feb 172005
 
Authors:

"It's not politics, its math," is an insincere piece of hate, which belittles those who are poor or need government assistance. Ryan Chapman wrote this editorial for his weekly column in the Collegian on Feb. 9. He argues against a bumper sticker that reads, "I am not rich enough to receive a tax break."

Chapman has several logical fallacies in his argument, including, "I argue that those displaying it are just not smart enough to receive a tax cut." He implies that everyone who has the bumper sticker in question is too stupid to receive a tax cut. Why write or print such animosity toward others? He goes on further to take cheap shots at those who use government assistance, calling them "mooches" of the government.

These comments should enrage its readers; I was on free lunch when I was young, does that make my parents stupid or me a "mooch"? Obviously, many of the Collegian readers are students who receive money in forms of grants and other government assistance. Are they mooches?

I cannot believe this hateful writing is allowed in the Collegian and I am overall disappointed with the staff for printing this argument. Chapman is a college student who is arguing about taxes, which I am sure he has little to no experience in. So, Mr. Chapman, when you receive that bumper sticker you created that states, "I'm not poor enough to mooch off of the government's generosity," make sure daddy says it's OK before you stick it on your new Lexus.

Kyle Ellerby

Junior

Speech communication major

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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To the editor:

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Feb 172005
 
Authors:

I love the fact that we idolize, praise and take advantage of our society's most ignorant people! Paris Hilton affects our televisions, Ashlee Simpson affects our radios and Samantha Spady affects our community. People are taking the mistakes of one person and then using those mistakes to blame and stereotype a group of people. Us! Let's take look at the mistakes of the latter person mentioned above. This person made a poor series of choices/mistakes/bad judgment calls or whatever you want to call it. Basically, SHE didn't know how much her system could handle! SHE didn't know her own limits! SHE didn't know or DIDN'T CARE how much she drank!

So, what do I have to with this? Why am I being punished for the ignorance of one person? I know MY limits! I know when to get a glass of water and make a run to Taco Bell!

What about the stereotypes? College kids are already working out a bad rap, but now because of SOMEONE'S bad decision-making skills, Sports Illustrated on Campus calls CSU a "drinking town with a college problem"! Again, my reputation is soiled because I go to CSU.

Now, what are some solutions? We are taking the right steps by changing the law so that we don't get in trouble for bringing in an intoxicated friend and by handing out education cards. Basically, we need to be vigilant at our parties, know how much we can handle and party with trustworthy friends. I realize this might make some people mad. But … everyone's thinking it, I just said it!

Erin Stobbs

Junior

Liberal arts major

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the editor:

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Feb 172005
 
Authors:

I had the most unusual experience in the library on Friday. I was enjoying a book and a cup of coffee when I was accosted by none other than a live gorilla. I was later informed that it was, in fact, a man dressed up in a suit, but for the three most mesmerizing minutes of my life, I was convinced. Apparently, this spectacle was part of a celebration for Charles Darwin's birthday. I was surprised to learn that an important and often-debated issue like evolution versus creationism was brought up on campus in a public forum and no mention was made of it in The Rocky Mountain Collegian.

Marcus Pickett,

Creative Writing MFA candidate

 Posted by at 5:00 pm