To the Editor:

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Feb 092005
 
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Proposed United Nations reforms will be discussed 3 p.m. Saturday at the Harmony Library by Dr. Dimitris Stevis, professor of political science at CSU. The reforms are proposed by a panel appointed by Secretary-General Kofi Annan. They may be the most important changes since the United Nations was created 60 years ago. All interested persons are welcome to the meeting sponsored by the Northern Colorado Chapter, United Nations Association — USA.

Ken Tharp

Community member

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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To the Editor:

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Feb 092005
 
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I am a CSU alumna, and a former opinion columnist for the Collegian. I'm writing to tell you about an urgent situation in Alaska. For the last two summers I worked as a biologist on a brown bear study. Our camp was between Katmai National Park and McNeil River Sanctuary — both famous bear-viewing areas (practically every picture of bears catching salmon in waterfalls are from these places.)

These areas have been closed to bear hunting for many years. Wide-open habitat and tolerant bears made Douglas the perfect place to study, but now the Alaska Board of Game wants to reopen brown bear hunting in this area. The BOG, with virtually no scientific input, is willing to slaughter this acclimated bear population for money. And the tolerance of the bears to humans will lead to a rapid depletion. I am certainly not anti-hunting. I know the importance of hunters to conservation. I just want to inform as many people as possible about this under-exposed issue. I have made a Web site about all of this: http://home.earthlink.net/~alaskabears/.

The deadline for written comments is Feb. 18, although it may be possible to get letters there in to March. Bears are not what most people think they are; they are slow and thoughtful more often than swift and brutal. The thought of losing such a unique population makes me indescribably sad. Please help me protect this wild place.

Anne Welch

CSU Alumna

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the editor:

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Feb 092005
 
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This is in response to Robert Drost's letter condemning Ward Churchill and Ben Bleckley for supporting his freedom of speech. Robert, this is the United States, and here we are allowed to express our beliefs and feelings with very few restrictions. True, as you said it is illegal to yell "fire" in a theatre. That is because it would cause chaos and perhaps undue injury.

Expressing one's beliefs is a far different kind of speech. Freedom of speech is regarded as an integral part of liberal democracies to outlaw government censorship. I remind you that burning the American flag remains a legal pursuit.

Ward Churchill expressed controversial views, but he has tenure. Tenure systems are justified by the claim that they provide academic freedom, by preventing instructors from being fired for openly disagreeing with authorities or popular opinion. To fire Churchill for expressing his views, however controversial, would be a step down a very slippery slope.

What next, firing people for what they read or how they vote? Your idea that Churchill should be arrested for treason is preposterous. Please, what country do you think this is?

 

Andrea Fellion

Senior, psychology major

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the editor:

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Feb 092005
 
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I am offended and appalled that you chose to publish Ryan Chapman's article, "It's not politics, it's math." The article is such an ignorant, over-simplified, inappropriate tirade demonstrating a lack of integrity, knowledge and research. I can only hope Mr. Chapman never has to be cut off from his apparent endless funds and be the recipient of welfare, federal tuition assistance and that his children will never go hungry. His lack of compassion and understanding of social issues is beyond disgusting.

Megan Vizina

Junior, social work

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the editor:

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Feb 092005
 
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I am writing in response to Vincent Adams' article "Conservatives missing point in Churchill fiasco." Mr. Adams, I don't believe that this is a matter of conservative or liberal arguments, but rather an argument of Americans.

While you may think that you are above Churchill's criticisms, you as well as all Americans fall under Churchill's generalized statements. How can you criticize President Bush for lying to the American public and then in the same article lie to all of your loyal readers?

Churchill's article was not simply a critique on U.S. foreign policy with some abrasive language and a poorly thought-out metaphor, but rather a direct attack on Americans — resulting in not just a "brain fart," but into a steaming pile of crap. 

Churchill refers to the Sept. 11, 2001, criminals as courageous, and as for Americans who died in the attack, he states: "Well, really. Let's get a grip here, shall we? True enough, they were civilians of a sort. But innocent? Gimme a break."  

However, I will agree with you that most Americans are missing the point on this debate. Churchill will be fired and he probably should be, but the First Amendment cannot protect him here. The degradation of the University of Colorado-Boulder's reputation will be the cause of his firing whether that is the stated reason or not.

After swirling rumors of sex scandals and accusations of rape encircled CU's campus, the last thing the university needed were these outrageous statements from one of its radical professors. If CU does not fire Churchill, there won't be one parent in the nation who would feel comfortable sending his or her child to CU.

Randy Manning

Sophomore, construction management

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the editor:

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Feb 092005
 
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Thanks for your "Our View" column on Wednesday, about Jose Canseco's whistle-blowing. Your bold condemnation of exposing information the public isn't aware of should be an example to us all.

Your ad hominem attacks, completely independent of any thought on his allegations, are a breath of fresh air. Other papers might stop to consider the questions he raises, or wonder what kind of guilt could rise out of giving drugs to your teammates and friends, but I know you Collegian types are too smart for that. Well done. In fact, I'm now going to discount all new information (or "news," as unsavory types have called it) unless I can see it with my own two eyes.

The rest of this paper is highly untrustworthy, and possibly unAmerican. I'll never touch it again. But you guys are OK!

Tim Miles

Senior, psychology

 Posted by at 5:00 pm