To the editor:

 Uncategorized
Dec 052004
 
Authors:

Intolerable fashion is reaching epidemic proportions here at CSU. I look around my classes and see a vast array of people who obviously don't own mirrors. With winter here, you would assume that students would be dressing accordingly, but those horrible fashion fads that plagued the summer months are still infesting our campus during the winter. No matter how good you think you look in your fuzzy Alaskan deer boots, when you wear them with a miniskirt in sub-freezing weather you look stupid, and cold. Some fads I can understand for a brief period of time. I understand that when two ditsy blondes trapped in the Midwest wear mesh trucker hats, the rest of you fashion lemmings will follow suit. Besides, they can't be all that bad; after all, now truckers from Chicago to Barstow are at the leading edge of current fashion. One of the fads that I cannot even begin to comprehend is these $2 Taiwanese shower shoes. They have no backs, they are full of holes and they are hideously ugly. For those of you choosing to wear open-heeled shoes or even sandals out in the snow, first off, there is snow stuck to your wool socks, and that tingling sensation is not the holiday spirit — it's frostbite. Well, the holidays are here and I pray that some of you out there ask Santa for a new wardrobe. Those who are truly in fashion are the individuals who don't need to re-stock their closet every week with whatever abomination MTV has recently made popular. Final note: Knitting as a hobby, are you 60?

Keith Pizio

Junior, computer science

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

To the editor:

 Uncategorized  Add comments
Dec 052004
 
Authors:

I would like to take a moment and commend the perspective Meg Burd (opinion columnist on Fridays) brings to the Collegian. She consistently brings up pieces of news that are usually excluded or glossed over in most U.S. media that is cheaply available to a poor college student like myself. On Friday she wrote about the chemical disaster that occurred in Brophal, India 20 years ago. Indeed, the worst chemical disaster in history. I find it interesting that all her information came from the BBC. Why is it that U.S. media so consistently leaves out international news that does not directly affect the United States? Are we really this self-absorbed of a nation? The front page on the Collegian's Friday edition asks where the best spot to kiss on campus is. This morning (Friday) while getting ready to leave for class, Fox News reported that the average woman is happiest while having sex and least happy while commuting. Who cares? I would like to see more articles that deal with real news. Thank you Meg for providing such articles.

Eric Olsen

Senior, English

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the editor:

 Uncategorized  Add comments
Dec 052004
 
Authors:

In the front-page article printed Friday on the whooping cough resurgence there is an error in the statement, "Consult a physician if you believe that you have whooping cough so antibiotics can be prescribed to prevent the spread of the virus." The article later refers to pertussis as both a bacterial infection and a virus. Pertussis is caused by bacteria and can be treated by antibiotics, but confusing viruses and bacteria serves only to cause the public to demand antibiotics for any illness. Antibiotics cannot treat viral infections and the demand for antibiotics for such infections is fueling a global medical crisis. Misuse of antibiotics increases antibiotic resistance to harmful bacteria that can lead to public health disasters. Bacteria that cause a range of illness from tuberculosis to sinusitis to ear infections are becoming resistant to many antibiotics, leaving doctors fewer options to successfully treat these illnesses.

 

Dale Lockwood

Program for Interdisciplinary Mathematics Ecology and Statistics

and United States Department of Agriculture

National Center for Genetic Resource Preservation

Colorado State University

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the editor:

 Uncategorized  Add comments
Dec 052004
 
Authors:

I wish to inform the students about prevention of the bubonic plague. The majority of plague cases that occur in the United States occur in the western states, and Colorado is one of the top four states to have cases of plague, along with Arizona, New Mexico and California. Surely many of students have noticed the squirrels around campus, and these rodents are some of the main vectors of the plague-harboring fleas. Although most plague cases appear in rural areas, I encourage students to take care when interacting with the squirrels on campus. I know they are cute and fuzzy little critters, but if you must feed them when they beg you with those pleading black eyes, be careful to avoid a bite or possibly transmission of a flea. The fleas associated with plague (Diamanus montanus) will readily bite a human if the opportunity becomes available, so please take care when outdoors, especially in the presence of rodents.

Kate Bruner

Freshman, animal science

 Posted by at 5:00 pm