To the editor:

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Nov 142004
 
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In response to Joe Marshall's Nov. 11 column, "Ashcroft's resignation good for freedom" in the Collegian, I am rather surprised at his inability to provide proof for certain statements. I have grown accustomed to reading many columnists from this paper spouting off rhetoric with no substantial factual backing. However, I have not grown acceptant of it.

In Thursday's paper Joe claimed, "America continues to imprison almost as many people as every other nation on earth combined." Now while it is true that we have the highest incarceration rate internationally (730 per 100,000 people, Russia is second with 690 per 100,000), to make such an absurd exaggeration is simply irresponsible journalism. I realize that Joe isn't a real journalist, he's a history major, but this does not exempt him from his responsibility to provide accurate information.

I also feel it necessary to point out that a member of a president's Cabinet resigning is actually quite a common occurrence. Half of former President Clinton's Cabinet (seven of 14 members) resigned within one week of his reelection, including Defense Secretary William Perry and Secretary of State Warren Christopher. Undocumented sources "close to the White House" saying his resignation was given "strong signals it would be accepted," is no indication of President Bush's administration being unsatisfied with his performance. Bush was quoted saying Ashcroft "served our nation with honor, distinction and integrity."

So next time you feel it necessary to personally attack a leader of our country, which is your constitutional right, perhaps you should do a bit more research instead of simply fabricating statistics.

 

Eric Rogan

Sophomore Political Science

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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To the editor:

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Nov 142004
 
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In response to Thursday's article, "Rams face final preseason test," in the Collegian, I must comment on how misleading one statement was. The statement reads, "Student seating has now been extended to the east end of the court in addition to the west end." What kind of extension takes away student seating and puts it somewhere else?

From my past three years of experience attending the men's basketball games, I have always had pretty close to front-row seating in the real student section (that in the southeast section). However, as I went to go sit in my regular section, an employee turned me away because this section is no longer a student section.

I am outraged. I now have the option of sitting up really high or sitting on the ends where the basketball hoop gets in my line of vision. Whose bright idea was it to take students further away from the game?

Tonight, during the first half, there were a grand total of nine people sitting in this newly nonstudent section, and by the second half, there were a whopping seven people. Thank you to whoever made that decision. Try again. Maybe next time you'll attract more fans, because after all, the students should be the No.1 fans the arena tries to attract.

 

Rachel Pantalion

Senior, Sociology major

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the editor:

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Nov 142004
 
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We should be horrified. We have democratically elected a fascist leader.

Dr. Lawrence Britt, a political scientist studying the regimes of Hitler, Mussolini, Franco, Suharto, and Pinochet, found that fascist regimes were all built on common strategic elements. I argue that the government of President George W. Bush shares these same characteristics of fascism:

Powerful and Continuing Nationalism

The Bush administration makes such constant use of patriotic mottos, slogans, and symbols, that patriotism no longer belongs to all Americans, but to Bush supporters.

Obsession with National Security and Disregard for Civil Liberties

Fear of terrorists is used as a tool by the Bush administration to convince Americans to forego civil liberties in the name of patriotism.

Religion and Government are Intertwined

Bush has used religion as a tool to manipulate public opinion even though the major tenets of Christianity are diametrically opposed to his policies and actions.

Supremacy of the Military

Despite widespread domestic problems, the military received $396 billion while the domestic agenda has been largely ignored.

Rampant Bigotry and Sexism

Under the Bush administration, traditional gender roles have become more rigid. Opposition to abortion is high, as is homophobia and anti-gay national policy.

Disdain for Intellectuals and the Arts

Bush is hostile toward higher education and academia. Free expression is openly attacked, and the government refuses to fund the arts.

Rampant Cronyism and Corruption

The Bush administration abuses governmental power and

authority to protect their industry friends from accountability. Polluters regulate themselves, and extractive industries are favored over the protection of natural resources.

The List Goes On…

 

Buffy Hastings

Graduate Degree Program in Ecology

Department of Forest, Rangeland, & Watershed Stewardship

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the editor:

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Nov 142004
 
Authors:

"Only Our Opinions Matter" is the worst segment currently published in the Collegian. Bondy and Baker show just how little they know about sports every time that section is printed.

The sports commentary is not funny or original.

Don't make personal references – we couldn't care less about Baker's brother or how much he looks like Napoleon Dynamite.

Try to discuss real issues in sports, such as why the Nuggets aren't doing so well instead of flapping your jaws about how Jeff Bzdelik should be fired. Mention something relevant such as the Nuggets' complete lack of jump shooters or their inability to run the court as effectively as they did last season.

That's the end of my rant. I'll be happy when somebody replaces this section of the paper with writers who are more original than burnt-out one-liners from Austin Powers' films.

 

Joshua R. Pickett

Junior technical journalism major

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the editor:

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Nov 142004
 
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I have read the letters to the editor concerning the low pay for part-time faculty with great interest. As a first-year Ph.D. student in the Department of Sociology I have learned that no matter how hard you work or how great your experience and expertise, CSU will treat you with the uttermost disrespect. In my own case, I entered CSU having completed a bachelor's degree (double major), three graduate degrees, and speak and read nine languages and yet received $0 in support from the university and my department, while master's students possessing one bachelor's degree and monolingual/bilingual were given departmental support. Furthermore, this wonderful university notified me only six days before the start of fall classes that I had been admitted though I lived 1,300 miles from Fort Collins. This, therefore, prevented me from applying for university and non-university grants/scholarships, teaching positions at CSU and local colleges, etc. In the last two and a half months that I have been a CSU student, the university and my department have done nothing for me. I have been repeatedly told that my prior knowledge is not applicable to sociology though two of my excellent former CSU anthropology professors teach courses that I took years ago that are cross-listed in sociology. These same professors teach in both anthropology and sociology. It amazes me how I went from being evaluated in the top 1 percent of graduate students at Harvard University to "incompetent" at CSU. Perhaps CSU does not understand "meritocracy"?

 

Robert Koehler

Ph.D. student, Sociology

 Posted by at 5:00 pm