Oct 272004
 
Authors: Anna Welle

Individuals, some under the radar and others who create a public

name, have an impact on the concert scene in Fort Collins. From

hip-hop shows at the Aggie Theatre to punk rock at the Starlight

Theatre, local promoters and venue managers work to bring in

entertainment largely based on a grassroots level.

“I don’t just promote any show coming through, only those I like

and believe in,” said independent promoter Ben Schroeder. “I try to

build with like-minded individuals. If you’re in it for the bucks,

you’re setting yourself up for failure right then and there.”

Personal interest, passion and involvement make a difference on

who plays a show in town.

“I try to go through members of bands, because they’re usually

my friends,” said Starlight Manager James Sargent. “I don’t really

like the business side of it.”

The respect and care through scrutinized attention help keep

performers coming back. When a show succeeds and has a good

turnout, the promoter succeeds as well.

“For us it’s motivation to truly care about a band and how they

do,” said Ben Davis, a promoter with Soda Jerk Presents. “It’s a

cooperative effort.”

When a band enjoys working with local promoters – from setting

up show dates and arranging the hotel to a promoter’s personality –

good things happen. The band will be all the more likely to return

to town and work with the promoter again and may also spread its

positive opinion to other acts in the industry.

“I want them treated like my best friend,” Schroeder said.

Dane Kane from 10,000 Breaks Productions wants to bring

underground hip-hop acts from Minneapolis to Colorado. He hopes

that those he works with, such as Heiruspecs and Kanscer, will

spread good word in the Twin Cities, fueling more artists’ interest

in the Front Range.

It’s this passion for music and those who create it that

develops the area’s concert scene and local artistic infusion.

“Fort Collins has a banging culture,” said James MacDowell,

promoter with and creator of CFS productions. “It’s quite the music

Mecca.”

MacDowell brought Eyedea and Abilities to town last spring. They

responded to the energetic crowd turnout by saying that Fort

Collins was the single best show they have done outside their home

base.

Getting the public interested in a show is another vital aspect

of the promoter’s job.

“The promoter is here to educate the locals and get out the

(merchandise),” Schroeder said.

Colorful posters and fliers distributed by a street team are two

ways to increase local knowledge. Mass e-mails, radio and newspaper

advertisements, and press releases also help to disseminate

information.

After booking and promotion, many factors can potentially cause

a show to fail. MacDowell sites competing shows, weather and too

many good concerts busting the customers’ wallets as influencing a

show’s failure.

“Every show goes wrong. It’s just a matter of being cool and

experienced to handle it,” Schroeder said. “That’s the time for the

promoter to shine.”

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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Oct 272004
 
Authors: Anna Welle

Individuals, some under the radar and others who create a public

name, have an impact on the concert scene in Fort Collins. From

hip-hop shows at the Aggie Theatre to punk rock at the Starlight

Theatre, local promoters and venue managers work to bring in

entertainment largely based on a grassroots level.

“I don’t just promote any show coming through, only those I like

and believe in,” said independent promoter Ben Schroeder. “I try to

build with like-minded individuals. If you’re in it for the bucks,

you’re setting yourself up for failure right then and there.”

Personal interest, passion and involvement make a difference on

who plays a show in town.

“I try to go through members of bands, because they’re usually

my friends,” said Starlight Manager James Sargent. “I don’t really

like the business side of it.”

The respect and care through scrutinized attention help keep

performers coming back. When a show succeeds and has a good

turnout, the promoter succeeds as well.

“For us it’s motivation to truly care about a band and how they

do,” said Ben Davis, a promoter with Soda Jerk Presents. “It’s a

cooperative effort.”

When a band enjoys working with local promoters – from setting

up show dates and arranging the hotel to a promoter’s personality –

good things happen. The band will be all the more likely to return

to town and work with the promoter again and may also spread its

positive opinion to other acts in the industry.

“I want them treated like my best friend,” Schroeder said.

Dane Kane from 10,000 Breaks Productions wants to bring

underground hip-hop acts from Minneapolis to Colorado. He hopes

that those he works with, such as Heiruspecs and Kanscer, will

spread good word in the Twin Cities, fueling more artists’ interest

in the Front Range.

It’s this passion for music and those who create it that

develops the area’s concert scene and local artistic infusion.

“Fort Collins has a banging culture,” said James MacDowell,

promoter with and creator of CFS productions. “It’s quite the music

Mecca.”

MacDowell brought Eyedea and Abilities to town last spring. They

responded to the energetic crowd turnout by saying that Fort

Collins was the single best show they have done outside their home

base.

Getting the public interested in a show is another vital aspect

of the promoter’s job.

“The promoter is here to educate the locals and get out the

(merchandise),” Schroeder said.

Colorful posters and fliers distributed by a street team are two

ways to increase local knowledge. Mass e-mails, radio and newspaper

advertisements, and press releases also help to disseminate

information.

After booking and promotion, many factors can potentially cause

a show to fail. MacDowell sites competing shows, weather and too

many good concerts busting the customers’ wallets as influencing a

show’s failure.

“Every show goes wrong. It’s just a matter of being cool and

experienced to handle it,” Schroeder said. “That’s the time for the

promoter to shine.”

 Posted by at 5:00 pm