Sep 232004
 
Authors: Daniel Linn

The taps never run dry at Sonny Lubick Field at Hughes

Stadium.

The new price for drinking at Hughes is $1,870, in addition to

the purchase price of two Ramshorn tickets.

Despite the recent suspension of alcohol sales at concession

stands in the stadium, alcohol is still provided in the Ramshorn

premium club-seating area, reserved for VIPs and people who

annually donate more than $1,870 to the university.

Gary Ozzello, director of media relations for CSU’s athletic

department, said alcohol is provided for premium members.

“It’s up to them whether they drink or not,” Ozzello said.

Though students’ right to drink may be on hold for the season,

premium guests are still enjoying the privilege for the time

being.

“It’s something we’ll look into pending the board’s decision,”

Ozzello said. “We hope it’s not sending the wrong message to

students.”

Ozzello said the stadium can make anywhere from $10,000 to

$25,000 in beer sales per game. He said losing this money is a

“secondary consideration” to the necessity of suspending the

sales.

Ozzello said CSU has no plans to make up for the loss.

The recent increase comes partially as the result of a roughly

$21 million donation from the Bohemian Foundation, a foundation

that promotes community involvement, $5 million of which helped

renovate the Ramshorn premium seating area.

“I think that it is all about the money. The only reason they

even considered banning students is that probably very few will

ever buy a $5 beer,” said Ben Wertsch, a sophomore history

major.

The future may not be too bright for CSU students’ beer

privileges.

Providing beer in club seats while banning it from students is

commonplace at university stadiums across the country.

In 1996, the University of Colorado-Boulder banned the sale of

beer at its student concessions. David Plati, CU’s director of

athletic media relations, said banning beer sales at Folsom Field

drastically cut down on the number of fights and alcohol-related

incidents.

“It shouldn’t be about the alcohol,” Plati said. “What are you

going to the games for?”

Plati said CU suffered little to no decrease in game attendance.

CU still provides alcohol to its premium members at the Flatirons

Club.

Other schools are facing the option of allowing beer in the

student stands after long-time bans. The University of North Dakota

allows non-student fans to take beer into the stands, but students

are not allowed alcohol in the stadium.

“We serve (alcohol) in the building; fans are allowed to take

alcohol in the stands, students are not,” said Roger Thomas, UND

athletic director. “We’ve played three games without incident.”

Thomas said the university had thought about allowing students

to drink beer at the games, but the president was hesitant.

“I can understand the students’ frustration,” Thomas said.

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