To the Editor

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Sep 082004
 
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I’m not sure what Duane Trimble (in a letter to the editor on Sept. 8) holds “near and dear,” but for many, many Americans it is a little ideal called “freedom.” I think the decision of Roe v. Wade as well as the support for (or at least the consideration of) gay marriage illustrates what liberals love most- letting adult people make choices about their lives, bodies and beliefs that are not dictated by anyone but themselves. By with holding choices from the citizens of this country, conservatives are in fact pushing their moral ideas onto others. Crisis pregnancy centers are great – keep them open and support them! But let women make their own choices about their own bodies. It is my opinion (and I’m sure I’m not alone) that conservative Christians should worry less about whom their next door neighbor is sleeping with and concentrate more on what Jesus was trying to teach in the first place – tolerance.

Jennie Hinton

Junior, Psychology major

970-310-6827

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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To the Editor:

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Sep 082004
 
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On behalf of the Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity, I would like to send our condolences to Samantha Spady’s family, friends and anyone else who was fortunate enough to know her.

This tragic event has reminded us all just how special the gift of life is. Sam and her family and friends are in our thoughts and prayers. Sam will continue to live on in our memories.

Shane Ferraro

Pi Kappa Alpha

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the Editor:

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Sep 082004
 
Authors:

It is regrettable that Brian Johanson (letter to the editor, Sept. 7) met with an act of intolerance for his political views. The lack of intelligent political debate, in our communities, in congress, and on the campaign trails, has been incredibly destructive to our country.

So, in the spirit of trying to foster something a little more constructive, I would like to hear Mr. Johanson’s views. I may not be the most receptive of audiences, because, quite frankly, I don’t understand why President Bush is so popular, but I will respectfully listen.

To begin the debate, here are two reasons why Bush is a catastrophe for democracy and freedom. First, the administration manipulates information to justify its policies and eliminates from the debate opposing views. Intelligence existed and was communicated to this administration that the presence of weapons of mass destruction and links to Al-Qaeda in Iraq were unlikely or non-existent, yet we emphatically heard both were true.

Second, I fear the blurring of the line between church and state. Do we need any reminder other than the Taliban in Afghanistan of how oppressive and dangerous religious zealotry can be when it tries to force its beliefs on others? Yet, this administration is moving us toward a country in which the laws of one religion apply to all.

Are my statements debatable? Probably. After hearing testimonials from current and former CIA officials, after reading studies by prominent scientists, and after following the news on Bush’s agenda, I believe they are true. How does a Bush supporter respond?

Mark Delorey

Statistics doctorate student

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the editor:

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Sep 082004
 
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George H. W. Bush promised America one thousand points of light during his 1989 Inaugural Address. It was a metaphor to demonstrate what he believed was the strength of America, the individual giving up their time and parts of their life for the greater good.

On Wednesday, the American public learned 1,000 soldiers have been killed in Iraq. The current Bush administration, along with Congress, has given us one thousand points of light snuffed out. Imagine the size of five general psychology classes, full of promise that will not be fulfilled. That represents 1,000 lives that will remain unfinished. Imagine 35 general psychology classes full of wounded individuals. These people will have their lives changed forever. And that’s not counting the Iraqi civilians. Their sacrifice and ending is something that should give us all pause, even as we reflect in our recent losses as CSU students.

A greater writer than I said of war, “many would die, but not the thing they died for.” The question before us, as citizens, is what did 1,000 people die for? Is it their comrades in arms? Political ambition? The idea of democracy? Oil? The answer is difficult but it is important to have an answer because we, as a government of the people, must all answer for 1,000 dead Americans.

Ian Derk

Senior English major

 Posted by at 5:00 pm