Nov 132003
 
Authors: Lindsay Robinson

By the end of this year, 13,856 trees will have been saved

thanks to recycling efforts at CSU.

Today on the Lory Student Center Plaza, reducing, reusing and

recycling will be celebrated in full as the Associated Students of

CSU and the CSU Recycling Committee present America Recycles Day, a

nationally recognized holiday dedicated to the three R’s.

Marjie Griek, executive director of the Colorado Association for

Recycling, said the purpose of the day is to raise awareness about

recycling.

“It’s to encourage people to continue to recycle and to bring

some education to closing the loop and buying recycled-content

products. It’s a good way to focus people’s awareness on recycling.

Otherwise you sort of get lost in the shuffle of daily living,”

Griek said. “It also gives people a chance to connect locally to

participate in events, learn about their local programs and find

other people who are doing similar things.”

Both CSU and the City of Fort Collins are hosting America

Recycles Day events. At CSU, tables will be set up on the Plaza

featuring sponsors such as New Belgium Brewing Company and several

local sanitation companies that offer recycling services. Mayor Ray

Martinez will be at CSU at noon to present a proclamation to the

sponsors.

Also, students will have the opportunity to sign pledge cards

promising to recycle; the cards will then be put in a drawing for a

2004 Ford Focus donated by Dellenbach Motors.

This year, CSU and Fort Collins have joined forces to offer cell

phone recycling. The phone collection bins will be available on the

Plaza today from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and at Wild Oats at 200 W.

Foothills Parkway on Saturday.

Sheila Bracken, integrated solid waste program manager at CSU,

said cell phone recycling is an important new trend because cell

phones create waste that can be harmful to the planet.

“(A cell phone) has a lot of things in it like lead that aren’t

good to put into the landfill. It’s a lot like recycling a

computer. It’s got a computer board and lots of things in it that

are not good for our Earth,” she said.

Britta Schroeder, a senior forestry major and associate director

of environmental affairs at ASCSU, hopes the event will raise

awareness about what can and cannot be recycled and also encourage

students to utilize the recycling facilities CSU offers.

“A lot of times, I see students throwing away a plastic bottle

or an aluminum can when they can just take to the recycling bin

around the corner. If you just hold onto it for two more seconds,

you can put it in the recycling bin,” she said. “CSU makes it very

easy for students to recycle, especially in the residence

halls.”

Griek thinks recycling is an important part of life that

everyone should work toward. She pointed out that recycling a

product not only saves that item from filling up a landfill, but it

also conserves water, energy and produces jobs within communities.

She said that recycling something requires 95 percent less energy

than making a new product from scratch.

“I don’t think it matters if you’re a kindergartener or a

college student or someone in your 60s; recycling is important

because we have finite resources here on Earth and there’s no sense

in using them up before we have to,” she said. “Don’t dispose of

things, put them in the recycling loop. And don’t forget to buy

recycled-content products.”

Bracken said people need to recycle as much as possible to

conserve the natural resources and save the earth. She advises

students to take advantage of CSU’s efforts to promote recycling

and to contact her office at 491-0113 if they have any

questions.

“We have provided bins for every room on campus and now all of

the apartments also have bins that Housing and Food Services has

provided. Use them,” she said. “If they want to put together

meetings to find out what can and can’t be recycled on campus, we

love to do presentations to anybody that’s willing to listen.”

 

 

 

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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Nov 132003
 
Authors: Lindsay Robinson

By the end of this year, 13,856 trees will have been saved

thanks to recycling efforts at CSU.

Today on the Lory Student Center Plaza, reducing, reusing and

recycling will be celebrated in full as the Associated Students of

CSU and the CSU Recycling Committee present America Recycles Day, a

nationally recognized holiday dedicated to the three R’s.

Marjie Griek, executive director of the Colorado Association for

Recycling, said the purpose of the day is to raise awareness about

recycling.

“It’s to encourage people to continue to recycle and to bring

some education to closing the loop and buying recycled-content

products. It’s a good way to focus people’s awareness on recycling.

Otherwise you sort of get lost in the shuffle of daily living,”

Griek said. “It also gives people a chance to connect locally to

participate in events, learn about their local programs and find

other people who are doing similar things.”

Both CSU and the City of Fort Collins are hosting America

Recycles Day events. At CSU, tables will be set up on the Plaza

featuring sponsors such as New Belgium Brewing Company and several

local sanitation companies that offer recycling services. Mayor Ray

Martinez will be at CSU at noon to present a proclamation to the

sponsors.

Also, students will have the opportunity to sign pledge cards

promising to recycle; the cards will then be put in a drawing for a

2004 Ford Focus donated by Dellenbach Motors.

This year, CSU and Fort Collins have joined forces to offer cell

phone recycling. The phone collection bins will be available on the

Plaza today from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and at Wild Oats at 200 W.

Foothills Parkway on Saturday.

Sheila Bracken, integrated solid waste program manager at CSU,

said cell phone recycling is an important new trend because cell

phones create waste that can be harmful to the planet.

“(A cell phone) has a lot of things in it like lead that aren’t

good to put into the landfill. It’s a lot like recycling a

computer. It’s got a computer board and lots of things in it that

are not good for our Earth,” she said.

Britta Schroeder, a senior forestry major and associate director

of environmental affairs at ASCSU, hopes the event will raise

awareness about what can and cannot be recycled and also encourage

students to utilize the recycling facilities CSU offers.

“A lot of times, I see students throwing away a plastic bottle

or an aluminum can when they can just take to the recycling bin

around the corner. If you just hold onto it for two more seconds,

you can put it in the recycling bin,” she said. “CSU makes it very

easy for students to recycle, especially in the residence

halls.”

Griek thinks recycling is an important part of life that

everyone should work toward. She pointed out that recycling a

product not only saves that item from filling up a landfill, but it

also conserves water, energy and produces jobs within communities.

She said that recycling something requires 95 percent less energy

than making a new product from scratch.

“I don’t think it matters if you’re a kindergartener or a

college student or someone in your 60s; recycling is important

because we have finite resources here on Earth and there’s no sense

in using them up before we have to,” she said. “Don’t dispose of

things, put them in the recycling loop. And don’t forget to buy

recycled-content products.”

Bracken said people need to recycle as much as possible to

conserve the natural resources and save the earth. She advises

students to take advantage of CSU’s efforts to promote recycling

and to contact her office at 491-0113 if they have any

questions.

“We have provided bins for every room on campus and now all of

the apartments also have bins that Housing and Food Services has

provided. Use them,” she said. “If they want to put together

meetings to find out what can and can’t be recycled on campus, we

love to do presentations to anybody that’s willing to listen.”

 

 

 

 Posted by at 5:00 pm