Oct 152003
 
Authors: Daniel Hallford

In her documentary, “Underground Ultrasound,” director Andrea

Allen shoves viewers off a slippery cliff of smeared music into a

pool of blasting guitars, quiet prophecies and light-speed

personalities.

The film takes you behind the scenes during a five-day weekend

where over 1,000 bands played in Austin, Texas. Beer bottles and

belly dancers abound and the antics of the festival shine through

in a mingling of humans, music and alcohol. All this breeds

happiness and provokes the wild antics of fans and musicians alike.

“Underground Ultrasound” is not “Insomniac with Dave Atell,” it’s a

inquisitive look into a fascinating blob of humanity that roils and

rocks for five days a year in the capital city of Texas.

“Underground Ultrasound,” showcases bands that have performed at

the world famous South by Southwest music festival.

“It’s a big celebration and everyone is going wild. Once you go

you’re hooked,” Allen said.

The film crew specializes in taking unique interviews, up close

and personal comes to mind, but being separated from their subjects

by chicken wire or a pink fur mask is not uncommon.

“Underground Ultrasound” was a collaboration of three minds all

former CSU students including Allen, Kelly Roan and Zorab Ovsepyan.

Allen decided to bring the work back to CSU, where she was a

student of Pete Seel, professor of documentary production at

CSU.

“Its great to have people come back and show their work,” Seel

said. “Andrea’s a role model (for students),” Seel said. Roan

quickly added, “She’s a trailblazer.”

After leaving CSU, the three went their separate ways. Kelly

Roan worked in Denver at a non-profit documentary center and Zorab

Ovsepyan worked in Los Angeles as a film production artist.

However, they all came together and hit the road for Austin and an

adventure in music video.

“We push each other…it’s very easy to settle for less, we push

each other to excel,” Ovsepyan said.

A 15-minute artistic film entitled “Culture Clash” preceded

“Underground Ultrasound.” “Culture Clash” was a work by Ovsepyan

about the diversity of culture on the planet, and the realization

that everyone is all of one race and people.

“(Culture Clash) is something outside of the average video,”

Ovsepyan said.

A picture of laughing children segues into rallies of religious

fanatics and high-speed car rides down empty city streets.

“It’s about the idea that all humans are one. To show how

diverse yet alike cultures are,” Ovsepyan said. “There is no reason

to separate the United States and the Middle East. All cultures

meet and sometimes there is no harmony, and sometimes there is

harmony.”

“Underground Ultrasound” received a packed house at Surfside 7

Cinema on Oct. 9. It was also part of Free Cinema, a series of

films and work done by current or former students, being played on

campus free of charge.

 

 

 

 

 

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

Oct 152003
 
Authors: Daniel Hallford

In her documentary, “Underground Ultrasound,” director Andrea

Allen shoves viewers off a slippery cliff of smeared music into a

pool of blasting guitars, quiet prophecies and light-speed

personalities.

The film takes you behind the scenes during a five-day weekend

where over 1,000 bands played in Austin, Texas. Beer bottles and

belly dancers abound and the antics of the festival shine through

in a mingling of humans, music and alcohol. All this breeds

happiness and provokes the wild antics of fans and musicians alike.

“Underground Ultrasound” is not “Insomniac with Dave Atell,” it’s a

inquisitive look into a fascinating blob of humanity that roils and

rocks for five days a year in the capital city of Texas.

“Underground Ultrasound,” showcases bands that have performed at

the world famous South by Southwest music festival.

“It’s a big celebration and everyone is going wild. Once you go

you’re hooked,” Allen said.

The film crew specializes in taking unique interviews, up close

and personal comes to mind, but being separated from their subjects

by chicken wire or a pink fur mask is not uncommon.

“Underground Ultrasound” was a collaboration of three minds all

former CSU students including Allen, Kelly Roan and Zorab Ovsepyan.

Allen decided to bring the work back to CSU, where she was a

student of Pete Seel, professor of documentary production at

CSU.

“Its great to have people come back and show their work,” Seel

said. “Andrea’s a role model (for students),” Seel said. Roan

quickly added, “She’s a trailblazer.”

After leaving CSU, the three went their separate ways. Kelly

Roan worked in Denver at a non-profit documentary center and Zorab

Ovsepyan worked in Los Angeles as a film production artist.

However, they all came together and hit the road for Austin and an

adventure in music video.

“We push each other…it’s very easy to settle for less, we push

each other to excel,” Ovsepyan said.

A 15-minute artistic film entitled “Culture Clash” preceded

“Underground Ultrasound.” “Culture Clash” was a work by Ovsepyan

about the diversity of culture on the planet, and the realization

that everyone is all of one race and people.

“(Culture Clash) is something outside of the average video,”

Ovsepyan said.

A picture of laughing children segues into rallies of religious

fanatics and high-speed car rides down empty city streets.

“It’s about the idea that all humans are one. To show how

diverse yet alike cultures are,” Ovsepyan said. “There is no reason

to separate the United States and the Middle East. All cultures

meet and sometimes there is no harmony, and sometimes there is

harmony.”

“Underground Ultrasound” received a packed house at Surfside 7

Cinema on Oct. 9. It was also part of Free Cinema, a series of

films and work done by current or former students, being played on

campus free of charge.

 

 

 

 Posted by at 5:00 pm