CSU’s shortest basketball player, Stephon Wynn

 No Video, Sports  Comments Off on CSU’s shortest basketball player, Stephon Wynn
Feb 052013
 

Author: Ryan Greene

[youtube]http://youtu.be/LKjQLCRXwSE[/youtube]

 

Although he may be the shortest Ram on the team, Stephon Wynn hopes to make a big contribution in the future.

Enhanced by Zemanta

CSU’s shortest basketball player, Stephon Wynn

 No Video, Sports  Comments Off on CSU’s shortest basketball player, Stephon Wynn
Feb 052013
 

Author: Ryan Greene

[youtube]http://youtu.be/LKjQLCRXwSE[/youtube]

 

Although he may be the shortest Ram on the team, Stephon Wynn hopes to make a big contribution in the future.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Too School for Cool: A second chance for a connection

 Blogs, The Well, Too School for Cool  Comments Off on Too School for Cool: A second chance for a connection
Feb 052013
 

Author: Allison LeCain

In this day and age, people rarely meet organically anymore. It seems less common for people to just meet at a bar, begin a conversation and live happily ever after. Instead we pride ourselves in making sure our online profiles are perfect, hoping for the chance to meet a hottie with a body online and have a fairy tale ending.

Now it’s come to this – there is a site online for people who met face to face, but didn’t make a move. It’s known as Craigslist Missed Connections.

M4M Missed Connection at Craigslist

Missed Connection at Craigslist (Photo credit: Ben Gertzfield)

Missed Connections is a place where people can post things about someone they have met in hopes that person will read it and get in contact with them. For example, a guy saw a cute girl at the grocery store. She was trying to reach for a can of soup on the top shelf that was just out of reach, so he got it for her. She thanked him, flashed a smile and walked away. When he got home he wished that he had asked for her number, so what’s a guy to do? Post about her on missed connections for his second chance at romance.

Craigslist is used throughout America and there is a Missed Connections page personalized for almost every major city. Generally the posts involve someone retelling the story of their brief encounter with their possible soul mate followed by a description of what the person looks like and a way to get in contact.

While in a way it’s great that people can have this second chance at a connection, reading the posts can be quite comical. I guess some people just don’t have the courage to make that first impression count.

While laughable to many, there are some people who check the site religiously to see if anyone has posted about them, in hopes of finding true love. In reality, I believe, if you don’t take advantage of that first chance at meeting someone, it probably wasn’t meant to be.

The truth is that most people who post on Craigslist Missed Connections probably won’t end up with a life that seems straight out of a romantic comedy screenplay, but it has happened, which makes me wonder, could this be the new, hip way of dating?

Just to be safe, you may want to check out Missed Connections. You may have flattered a cute barista lately that is looking for you, awaiting your happily ever after.

Too School for Cool: A second chance for a connection

 Blogs, The Well, Too School for Cool  Comments Off on Too School for Cool: A second chance for a connection
Feb 052013
 

Author: Allison LeCain

In this day and age, people rarely meet organically anymore. It seems less common for people to just meet at a bar, begin a conversation and live happily ever after. Instead we pride ourselves in making sure our online profiles are perfect, hoping for the chance to meet a hottie with a body online and have a fairy tale ending.

Now it’s come to this – there is a site online for people who met face to face, but didn’t make a move. It’s known as Craigslist Missed Connections.

M4M Missed Connection at Craigslist

Missed Connection at Craigslist (Photo credit: Ben Gertzfield)

Missed Connections is a place where people can post things about someone they have met in hopes that person will read it and get in contact with them. For example, a guy saw a cute girl at the grocery store. She was trying to reach for a can of soup on the top shelf that was just out of reach, so he got it for her. She thanked him, flashed a smile and walked away. When he got home he wished that he had asked for her number, so what’s a guy to do? Post about her on missed connections for his second chance at romance.

Craigslist is used throughout America and there is a Missed Connections page personalized for almost every major city. Generally the posts involve someone retelling the story of their brief encounter with their possible soul mate followed by a description of what the person looks like and a way to get in contact.

While in a way it’s great that people can have this second chance at a connection, reading the posts can be quite comical. I guess some people just don’t have the courage to make that first impression count.

While laughable to many, there are some people who check the site religiously to see if anyone has posted about them, in hopes of finding true love. In reality, I believe, if you don’t take advantage of that first chance at meeting someone, it probably wasn’t meant to be.

The truth is that most people who post on Craigslist Missed Connections probably won’t end up with a life that seems straight out of a romantic comedy screenplay, but it has happened, which makes me wonder, could this be the new, hip way of dating?

Just to be safe, you may want to check out Missed Connections. You may have flattered a cute barista lately that is looking for you, awaiting your happily ever after.

Defying a social standard

 Features, The Well  Comments Off on Defying a social standard
Dec 072012
 

Author: Hannah Woolums

The social norm has been created that right after graduating high school one is expected to go to college.

Many have given in to this expectation, but many others decided to enter into the workforce right away due to different factors that caused them to make the decision.

For 19-year-old, Ethan Midland, going to college wasn’t what he had his sights set on when he graduated high school. His first plan was to join the Army, but then after some persuasion, he decided to stay and work full time.

“I initially was going to go into the Army when I got out of high school. I had pretty much made up my mind and was prepared to go, but my parents (who were very against it) swayed my decision. So instead of going in to the Army, I decided it would be better to just take time off of school,” said Midland.

Although Midland has taken time off from school he plans to start up at Front Range Community College in the near future. He plans to start with taking his general education classes before he decides on a major. For the time being, he will continue to gain experiences as a Shift Lead at Taco Bell.

“The decision has impacted my life mostly in the fact that I’m a bit behind in schooling. It had honestly, in my opinion, set me back,” said Midland. “I plan on going back to school very soon at FRCC (Front Range Community College). First for my general eds and from there we will see!”

Shalon Gage, 24, deviated from her college education for a very different reason. Once she had her son, college no longer seemed as adamant. As an employee of Taco Bell, she quickly worked her way up to the position of assistant manager. With her job and her son, college no longer seems like it fits into the picture.

“If I were given the chance I would not go to college, mostly because I want to be there for my kid,” said Gage.

For others, college was not a priority right after high school and working gave them experiences and knowledge they will never forget.

Dale Woolums, father and wine store manager, grew up in a different social standard. College was not a strong expectation and he factored in his family as a reason why he ended up not attending.

“College was not a priority for my family. Neither of my parents went, and it wasn’t discussed with me, at least I didn’t remember it being. It wasn’t that I decided not to go to college, I just kept working, running kitchens, and then restaurants, and before I knew it, I hadn’t gone,” said Woolums.

Although many years have gone by, Woolums would not have changed the path he followed. Through jumping into work right after high school, Woolums was able to work hard and advance within his company.

He has had a few different jobs throughout his lifetime, but even without going to college, he was able to make his way into management positions in more than one of the jobs he held. Now at 56, Woolums is proud of the experiences he had.

“I didn’t decide my path, I followed it. My career moves were just that, moves, from where I was, to something better. I was fortunate that my career didn’t require a degree to get into, then advancements were based on performance. Not relying on a degree to be ‘successful’ developed my common sense and logic, efficiency and creativeness. While I lack certain skill sets that I could have learned in college, I acquired some that are only taught by experience,” said Woolums.

Midland has had a different experience from not going to school. He has made great friendships but has not seen a huge difference in gathering real life experience over education.

“I’m not sure I’ve gained a whole lot from doing work rather than school. I’ve definitely gained friendships that I would never give up. I’ve also now gained a bit of management experience,” Midland explained. “Mostly what ended up happening as a result of not being in school was the large amount of partying, more than I should have. And mainly what made me decide to take the role as a manager at TB (Taco Bell) was the extra money.”

Although he has had a very successful life, first as a kitchen manger, and now as a manager of a liquor store in Denver, Woolums has seen many jobs in between. Some of which are a wine broker, and then moving on to a real estate agent and to buying houses to ‘fix-and-flip.’ However, he says that if he were able to do something differently, given the chance he would have gone to school.

“I would have gone (to school), for sure. At the time, I wasn’t a great student when I graduated from high school, although I got pretty good grades for the amount of effort I gave. I was ‘to cool for school’ then and after a few years, it never occurred to me to go,” explained Woolums.

A colorful blend of beliefs and the universal spiritual journey

 Features, The Cache, The Well  Comments Off on A colorful blend of beliefs and the universal spiritual journey
Dec 042012
 

Author: Mary Willson

At the Shambhala Stupa, in Red Feather, Prayer flags serve to promote peace, compassion, strength and wisdom.

At the Shambhala Stupa, in Red Feather, Prayer flags serve to promote peace, compassion, strength and wisdom.

The Earth’s population lives on a single mass of land, yet through cultural divides it

Michael Lichtback lights a menorah at the Chabad Jewish Center located in campus west shopping area. The menorah is part of Hanukkah, an eight day Jewish festival also known as “the festival of lights,” which falls over finals week this semester.

Michael Lichtback lights a menorah at the Chabad Jewish Center located in campus west shopping area. The menorah is part of Hanukkah, an eight day Jewish festival also known as “the festival of lights,” which falls over finals week this semester.

can feel as if the seven billion inhabitants of this seven continent globe are disconnected by galaxies.

Through the religious divides based on morality, upbringing, culture and political pressure—society and religion can easily become intertwined. The melting pot of the United States and a very diverse campus blurs these lines and creates an accepting atmosphere. Despite the commercial Christmas trees—red, green and white merry making—and the overwhelming Christian symbolism throughout the winter months, diversity is celebrated—a unique asset in the grand scheme of the world.

“I feel like I can practice my religion freely here in the US,” said Fares Alotaibi, freshman computer engineering and computer science major, whom is here from Saudi Arabia.

“You can see that in said Arabia they say that Muslim is 100 percent  of the population, but I think that is impossible,” Alotaibi said. “I think you need to accept that there are other people and religions.”

Alotaibi will work for an oil company in Saudi Arabia when he graduates, an opportunity only the top 3 percent of a national test get the opportunity to do. His main objective for a United States education is for the degree, yet the accepting culture is something that has changed his own perspective on the way humans view each other. Which, as a practicing Muslim, comes as a pleasant surprise.

“A different country means different culture, so you get used to it,” Alotaibi said. “That was a big change, I love the US in the way that everyone can practice their own religion and people respect all religions. I respect that. If you people respect my religion, I will respect yours.”

Culture, family roots and society are three main assets to the formation of personal spiritual beliefs. Yet, within the realm of college and a fresh slate for personal growth, new paths can be shared creating new belief systems.

“It kind of started out with not necessarily agreeing with everything that came with the Catholic or Christian religion in general,” said Darrel Suer, junior marketing and CIS business major.

Suer started the Meditation and Buddhism Interest Club on campus last year after becoming passionate about the Buddhist belief system from a series of CSU religion classes. He was raised Catholic.

“The Catholic Church is very hierarchical. I don’t think that’s the best way to practice religions because then it feels almost like government rather than spiritual. At the end of the day, we’re all the same,” he said. “You’re a person, I’m a person, we should be treated that way.”

Within the worldwide pie of major universal religions, Christianity makes up 33 percent, Islam makes up 22.5 percent, Hinduism makes up 13.6 percent, Buddhism makes up 6.7 percent and Judaism makes up .3 percent according to Britanica.com, an online encyclopedia. Although these international numbers do not depict the personal lives committed to a certain belief system, through cultural pressures based on location and communal practices, religious pressures many times follow.

As December 24 comes around the corner, Christian churches see their pews fill, and a weeklong shift into religion many times takes place. This is just as prevalent as ever, even with different religions and in difference practices.

MacMcGolrick, a religious studies professor, is focused in teaching eastern religions and personally practices Buddhism.

“Religion and culture are extraordinarily important, and the religion and expression there is similar to the practice and expression here,” he said.

Through the hype that is depicted from the societal-made holiday, Black Friday, and onward through New Years, commercialism and present giving is ballooned into an economical monster. Yet, when pulled back inward it is structured on the practice of giving, a universal act.

“It’s just a matter of keeping it in perspective, I mean this was one holiday that used to mean something else. Its not a bad thing, I just think sometimes people mis-proioriatize what is going on,” Suer said.

Suer’s mother is Catholic, but feels her spirituality within herself, and it is not based on going to church or other societal practices.

“She feels so strongly that there is a god—she beliefs in that so strongly. I have a lot of respect for that,” Suer said. “She has just as strong of a faith as anyone else. I think that’s more the emphasis, the family sides of things.”

Although within the US, an attitude of acceptance is practiced and felt overall—the logistical side of a diverse practice of religions can ignite logistical problems for holiday practices.

Michael Lichtback, senior mechanical engineering major and president of the Jewish club, had an engineering exam on Hanukah last year, and regularly have important schoolwork on equally important religious holidays. His family is culturally and religiously Jewish.

“We just have to negotiate all kinds of things. It really bothered me when I was younger and classmates would say ‘Merry Christmas’ and I would respond with ‘you know everyone doesn’t celebrate Christmas, right?’ I would be really bitter,” he said. “And now I’ve kind of come to peace and it doesn’t bother me as much because they have good intentions.”

Through the explorations of Christianity, Judaism, Islam, and Buddhism, which have been taken on at CSU with confidence, the spiritual journey seems universal.

“It’s not about this practice or that practice because someone said so,” Suer said. “It’s about what is most effective for the person. There might be really great facets of all religions for human beings living in all different ways, but it’s about incorporating and not divisive in any way.”

Through the search for fulfilling spirituality, exploring out of ones culture can be revealing, whether to commit yourself to the roots personally, or to grow within a practice that has been within oneself all along.

“I think there’s a negative mentality where we need to appease everyone,” Lichtback said. “There’s this binary idea where you’re either religious or not. I think of it as more of a continuum where you can just do whatever you want.”

And for some, a path for change motivates pride in religion. Through the world of college, a melting pot of religions, ideas, ages, life stages and places are mixed together. With acceptance as a goal, there is always progress to be made.

“In the last 10 years there been a big bad idea about Islam. I know there are bad Muslims, but there are a lot of good ones,” Alotaibi said. “I think it is kind of going away, I am very grateful for that. You never know what a person is or who people are unless you go and talk to them. That’s the thing I want to bring to this conversation.”

In a diverse world full of seven billion unique and differing personalities, minds, soul and hearts, just as many belief systems manifest themselves. What is key is that the importance of our colorful world is never lost.

“I am learning diversity and actually when I get back to my country I will try to change the point of view,” Alotaibi said.

Souled Out: The Dream Factory

 Blogs, Souled Out, The Well  Comments Off on Souled Out: The Dream Factory
Nov 162012
 

Author: Cassandra Whelihan

Sparking dreams and igniting the crowd, Teton Gravity Productions new film, “The Dream Factory,” had the crowd on their feet with wintery anticipation. Highlighting America’s last frontier, Alaska’s true beauty was brought to life throughout the film.

The mystical awe of Alaska has lured pioneers for thousands of years. With not a soul insight, the message seems to be that the glory is not the gold, but rather the finding of the gold, and that’s exactly what Teton productions achieved.

Chuck McMahan, a true pioneer in unbridled exploration was responsible for the first ski airplane ride. Back in the eighties, when a helicopter ride was the price of a latte, $5, he helped pave the way for what lies just beyond the boundaries.

Limited only by their imaginations, Dream Factory successfully touched upon the progression the ski industry has undergone.

The riders’ ability to stand where no one has ever stood and to ski where no one has ever skied is a reality few people actually achieve in their lifetimes.

The attention to detail and story-like narrative has me convinced that everyone should partake in the unmatchable experience of solitude that Alaska has to offer.

One thing I did find puzzling was the lack of ladies with Angel Collinson being the only female featured.

Regardless, the snow-goers in this film show you what it means to be dedicated to pursuing the best days you can think of in an annual migration to Alaska.

The soundtrack left me longing in anticipation to hit the slopes. Leaving me wanting more, I give this film an A+ for electrifying the crowd.

If you’re looking to get gassed for the season, I definitely recommend this one.

Check it out:the-dream-factory

How CSU students vote for judges and justices on the ballot

 News, Politics  Comments Off on How CSU students vote for judges and justices on the ballot
Nov 052012
 

Author: Kelsey Peterson

[youtube]http://youtu.be/LJr_8S4fHHE[/youtube]

 

When looking at the ballot and seeing names unattached to a political party, it’s hard to know what to do. These names are those of judges and justices already in office. The ballot gives an option to mark yes or no. This is to say whether or not you want that person retained in office. When voting it is important to know that qualified judges are those who help to keep our courts impartial and fair. To be retained, a judge must receive at least 60 percent of the vote. Some people just vote all yes. Some do a little research. Some don’t vote at all. Two CSU students used their own method.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Souled Out: CSU Snowriders

 Blogs, Souled Out, The Well  Comments Off on Souled Out: CSU Snowriders
Oct 222012
 

Author: Cassandra Whelihan

Do you ever stare out your classroom window lost in a winter-wonderland of a day-dream wishing it would just hurry up and snow already? How about the old, “I’ll just watch one Warren Miller film” and end up getting lost in cyber snow-land. Are you one of the kids that plan their classes around your snow schedule?

Fortunately, if you too can relate to the highly anticipated winter season, there is a club at Colorado State University for you! The Snowriders are a recreational ski and snowboard club on campus at Colorado State University dedicated to getting you to the mountains. Our mission is to be your number one resource for skiing and snowboarding. Furthermore, we want to create a fun and welcoming environment for anybody and everybody who wants to ride, no matter how experienced or inexperienced you are.

CSU Snowriders: Where the members ride hard, and the officers work harder to ensure your winter is the best it can be!

Check out our website for more information at https://sites.google.com/a/rams.colostate.edu/csusnowriders/

Check out Officer Nick Micheletti’s promotional video

Souled out: Avalanche certified

 Blogs, Souled Out, The Well  Comments Off on Souled out: Avalanche certified
Oct 192012
 

Author: Cassandra Whelihan

Taking off with a snowboard, backpack and essentials into the mountains in search of epic lines is a thrilling alternative to skiing at a resort. Nonetheless, backcountry skiing is not for the faint of heart. It comes with a serious awareness of your surroundings and an understanding of avalanches and potentially life-threatening conditions.

 

Moreover, a basic knowledge of snow could mean the difference between a memorable day in the powder or an unforgettable tragedy. The surface warming with respect to the meteorological processes has a dramatic effect on the safety of the snow pack. A hard snow pack on top of a soft snow pack can trigger an avalanche. Furthermore, back country enthusiast should understand the best paths to hike up a mountain in addition to the safest routes down.

Thankfully, Colorado offers plenty of classes to get you informed and out into the wild. AIARE, the American Institute for Avalanche Research and Education, is dedicated to saving lives through avalanche education. They offer five classes geared toward public awareness of avalanches and avalanche safety.

The Avalanche Awareness course is two hours of class time tailored to the public. Introduction to Avalanche Safety is a two day course personalized for riders that frequent avalanche terrain via access roads or chair lifts. The Level one, two and three courses involve hiking into backcountry, camping, skiing and learning about avalanche safety precautions through hands on experience.

AIARE enables individuals to choose the best class for their intended excursions and become esteemed “wild snowers.” Backcountry is where it really happens and human powered adventure skiing is an entirely new approach for snow enthusiasts. Just make sure that you are packed with preparation for any element of surprise Mother Nature may throw your way.

This video portrays the brilliance of backcountry skiing, but also how dangerous it can be if you are inexperienced.