Mar 052013
 

Author: Ricki Watkins

What does it feel like to have the entire community supporting your great idea? Or, how does it feel to donate to a great cause and get some cool swag in return? Well, it feels like Community Funded.

Photo courtesy of Community Funded.

Photo courtesy of Community Funded.

Community Funded, a Fort Collins-based company, helps individuals, for-profit and nonprofit organizations and groups connect to the people within their community to raise money for worthwhile causes.

How does it work exactly? Well,say the owner of a small business wants to expand but does not have the money to do so. After submitting an idea to CF and having it approved, the owner has a certain number of days to raise a set amount of money. Individuals and organizations can then go to CF’s website and learn more about the proposed project. If they like the project, they can choose to either donate money to the cause or purchase what CF terms as “giftbacks.” Giftbacks are either products or services donated by the project creator — “project giftbacks” — or by other organizations — “in-kind giftbacks.” For example, you can buy a case of Odell beer or a Mugs Coffee Lounge gift card and donate to the project at the same time.

If the project creator is for-profit and makes their fundraising goal within the timeframe, they get to keep the money they raise. If not, the donations are returned back to the donors. If the project creator is a nonprofit, regardless of whether they meet their fundraising goal or not, they receive the money raised.

“We really set out to build this tool that helps people create awareness of good ideas while uniting a community,” said McCabe Callahan, CF co-founder and owner of Mugs Coffee Lounge.

Callahan, along with co-founders Blue Hovatter and Ryan Stover, built CF off of existing crowdfunding websites. What sets them apart is that instead of fundraising to a faceless crowd, the founders wanted to focus on community.

“What defines you is really the relationships you have in your life,” Callahan said. “If you have heard the saying ‘It takes a village to raise a child,’ I think it really takes a community to make a great idea happen.”

Individuals and organizations have raised almost $290,000 for their projects through CF since the company’s launch a little less than a year ago.

 

Photo courtesy of Community Funded.

Photo courtesy of Community Funded.

What’s your ‘it’?

And remember that small business owner that wanted to expand? Well, meet Charly Clifford. Owner of Charly Bar, an energy bar company, Clifford utilized Community Funded and raised over $15,000 within his timeframe.

Charly Bar is Clifford’s “it” as CF says. What is an “it”? According to CF, your “it” is what you’re passionate about.

“We like to ask people, ‘What’s your it?’ because no matter what ‘it’ is, it can be Community Funded,” said Stover, who is also CF’s Creative Director.

“Times are crazy right now with money, and loans are not necessarily the best way to go about things, especially if you are not tried and true and you just want to try something and you don’t want to necessarily jump off the deep end and get a big loan and have to pay that back forever,” Clifford said.

Clifford, who donates one percent of his profits to youth health and wellness programs, has already moved to a new kitchen and purchased new equipment with some of the money he raised.

“I am looking forward to growing the business and having a lot more community impact,” Clifford said.

What is Stacy Sebeczek’s ‘it’? The Fort Collins Bike Library, where anyone can checkout a bike for free. As director of the Bike Library, Sebeczek was looking for some way to find funding for 2013, as the Bike Library’s five-year federal grant would be expiring in December 2012.

Through CF, the Bike Library raised $10,000. Coupled with contributions from New Belgium, the City of Fort Collins and the Downtown Development Authority, the Bike Library raised enough money to keep its doors open for 2013.

“It raised a ton of awareness for our cause,” Sebeczek said. “Part of our transition after funding ran out in 2012 was not just a simple ‘we need some money to operate next year,’ it was a very comprehensive ‘we are transitioning from a grant-dependent model to something that is more sustainable with community collaboration.’ So, it was important for us to use that community piece for the awareness and exposure of our cause … Community Funded really helped us with that, especially having their strong team behind it; it is a very passionate group of individuals and they are so well connected and so willing to push projects and help them get the exposure they need.”

 

How do I get involved?

So, you are a college student, how can you get involved with CF? In three ways, according to Callahan.

One, you can support ideas and projects in your community by donating or buying giftbacks — you get some sweet swag that you were already going to buy, but now that money goes to a great cause.

“It is a great way for students to support great ideas and community while getting something back in exchange because a lot of students don’t have disposable income and a lot are tight with money and have student loans,” Callahan said. “So, instead of feeling like you have to come up with this extra money, what Community Funded allows for is this ability to shop for things you are going to use and do anyways, but also having impact in your community, which is a cool feeling to know that you are actually causing things to happen.”

Two, if you have a great idea, shout it out and use Community Funded to make that idea reality.

“Whether it is a class project or a big goal that they have in life, it is an opportunity to share what they are passionate about and get the support of the people that already support them,” Stover said.

Speaking from experience, Clifford said he believes having the support of your community is extremely motivational.

“It’s a lot of encouragement just to know that people believe in what you are doing … it makes you want to go out and try harder, it gives you definitely something to strive for,” Clifford said.

Three, spread the word.

“Just because you can’t fund a project actually and you don’t want to start one, doesn’t mean you don’t see a good idea like the Bike Library and be willing to talk about it,” Callahan said. “By talking about it, you are also supporting that project, so you become this hero, this cheerleader for the different ideas on the website.”

Bottom line: “Even you can have impact on your community through tools like this,” Callahan said.

 

The future of CF

What is the future for CF? Growth and greater impact.

“Fort Collins is definitely community-centric and it is full of big ideas and people that are passionate about creating change in the world, so it definitely makes sense that it started in Fort Collins — it was fertile soil for this kind of idea, but really, the next step to this is to grow this outside of Fort Collins and really become a national movement,” Stover said.

With more than 2,000 registered individuals and almost 400 registered organizations from all over the U.S., and growing, it looks like CF is well on its way to success.

“My hope is that as many people that need to use it, use it to cause greater impacts in their communities and if that is worldwide, I am okay with that,” Callahan said.

 

 

Fort Collins saved the Lyric

 Beats, Features, Scene & Heard, The Well  Comments Off on Fort Collins saved the Lyric
Sep 012012
 

Author: Kenneth Myers

Movie Theater

Movie Theater (Photo credit: roeyahram)

The movie theater industry is getting an upgrade, putting a strain on small local theaters.

Lyric Cinema Cafe epitomizes the idea of a small business. Less of a cinema and more of a large living room, the Lyric’s two theaters boast smaller screens, a less explosive sound system and less-than-traditional movie seating. Overall, the Lyric isn’t in competition with the 16-screen corporate theaters, but is in its own element.

So when this spring a courtesy call to the Lyric from Magnolia Studios revealed that they would no longer be distributing 35 milometer movie prints but only digital prints, the Lyric was facing what seemed an insurmountable expense: upgrading to digital projectors. Early estimates put a price tag of $150 thousand on the necessary upgrades and their installation. Something had to be done.

That’s when Michael Putlack, the Lyric’s “social media guru” decided to turn to the community. Using Kickstarter.com, a website designed to allow people to fund projects easily, Putlack planned to raise any money he could to keep the Lyric in business.

Film reel (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“It was a Hail Mary — none of us thought it would work,” Putlack said. “Maybe we’d get a little [money] to help, but when it was over we would still have time to figure out something else that could actually raise the rest of what we needed.”

The Kickstarter began on July 6, and from day one was being backed by at least 25 new people everyday, with no less than $1,587 added everyday. The average pledge amount was $68, and by Aug. 6, the Lyric had its $150 thousand.

Putlack was at a performance of Hairspray when the news came through to him that the fundraiser had reached its goal. When he raced to the Lyric to share the news, he was greeted by the rest of the staff as a hero, with champagne waiting.

The support the Lyric received wasn’t only financial, with Next Media Group bolstering awareness with free billboard space and Go West T-Shirt Company providing the t-shirts as a reward for backers.

The Lyric is able to upgrade its projectors early next year due to the financial support shown by the Fort Collins community.

“We just want to thank everyone who contributed,” Putlack said. “We might not have made it without them.”