Papagoya Live at KCSU

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Apr 012013
 

Author: Nicole Beale

Papagoya played a live set on KCSU on Wednesday, March 27. They busted out an acoustic set, something that they had

Papagoya playing at KCSU. Photo by Nicole Beale.

Papagoya playing at KCSU. Photo by Nicole Beale.

never done before. It was quite the treat for both listeners and for those few witnessing their performance.

Papagoya has an eclectic sound that is as unique as they are. They consider themselves to be in the genre of jungle funk.  For their shows, Papagoya uses electric instruments, creating a different sound than what was heard on KCSU. However, they create an extremely unique sound by combining an odd arrangement of instruments and exposing their culture. Tobias Bank, a member of Papagoya, hails from Sweden. The name ‘Papagoya’ is a play on a Swedish word ‘Papegoja’, meaning ‘Parrot’.

During their acoustic performance on KCSU, Papagoya had five out of their six members and featured an upright bass, slide guitar, an accordion, and a suitcase kick drum. Yes, it was actually a suitcase. Drummer, Tobias Bank, decided to travel smart by packing his bass drum in a suitcase. In fact the drum itself was a suitcase. After their set, Bank was able to put all of the pedals and cymbals he used right into the suitcase and out he went. It created a very low and short sound, adding to Papagoya’s uniqueness.

Papagoya began the night by playing El Pollo Loco and then played Wash Away that featured Colin Boyle on slide guitar. Their third song, Gypsy Kings, was sung in Spanish by Dimitri Zaugg and then the band played Dealin’ with D’s Bedtime. That song title came about because the band was always forced to rehearse early due to Dimitiri Zaugg’s early bedtime. After a slew of callers called in, including one listening in New Zealand, the band decided to play an encore which was called Show ‘em How Good We Do. The band also threw in a few snippets of the songs from their EP, titled Symatree, that was released in August of 2012.

Papagoya are locals from Fort Collins gaining in popularity. They have secured several shows for the summer making it easy to check them out.  Papagoya’s next show will be at FoCoMX and then Wakarusa May 30 to June 3. To get a better feel for what these guys sound like, check out the live recording of the set at KCSU.

https://soundcloud.com/90-5-kcsu-local-loco/papagoya-in-studio-performance

 

FoCoMX gets rock and rolling for the fifth year

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Mar 292013
 

Author: Tony Vessels

Fort Collins is a great city for artists. Not only do we have CSU, which has a fantastic program for music, theater and dance, but the city of Fort Collins also has multiple foundations and groups dedicated to the arts and to the many fans of music and art.

The Fort Collins Music Association, or FoCoMA, is one such group. Founded in 2009 by Greta Cornett and Kevin Micke, FoCoMA concentrates on local music, aiding bands with getting up on their feet.

Dead Floyd playing at the Aggie Theatre at FoCoMX 2012. Photo by Allison LeCain.

Dead Floyd playing at the Aggie Theatre at FoCoMX 2012. Photo by Allison LeCain.

The Fort Collins Music eXperiment (FoCoMX) is a weekend long annual music festival in Fort Collins run by FoCoMA, and this year marks the fifth time around.

FoCoMX features a wide variety of local bands and music types, including (but not limited to) reggae, Latin, metal, pop, blues, jazz, electronic and rock.

“I love FoCoMX because it really lets me experience what our city is all about,” said Bradley Vogel, a Fort Collins native. This year will mark the third year in a row Bradley has attended FoCoMX.

“I love seeing the city, and I love hearing the music in such a friendly space,” Vogel said. “It’s almost like I have a personal investment in all these bands because they’re homegrown. And I love witnessing their growth.”

The venues widely vary and are all over Old Town Fort Collins and the northern part of the city. From bars, bowling alleys, and movie theaters, FoCoMX has become a great way to get a good taste of local music in the truly unique setting of Fort Collins.

Sponsored by FoCoMA, the City of Fort Collins, the Bohemian Foundation, Odell Brewing Co., and many others, it truly is a great example of local sights and sound.

“I’ve been looking forward to the festival ever since I first heard about it. It sounds amazing,” said Sarah Julie. FoCoMX5 will be her first time going to the festival.

“I think it’s amazing how Fort Collins is so dedicated to music. This is an amazing opportunity for the bands and us fans alike,” Julie said.

FoCoMX5 accepts hundreds of volunteers every year, from working the door at venues, assisting with production or staging, helping with will-call and ticket stands, or even emceeing a stage. FoCoMX prides itself in allowing volunteers to help out, making it a great time for all.

FoCoMX5 is happening on the nights of April 19 and April 20. Wristbands can be purchased online at focomx.focoma.org for $20 through April 7. After that, they can be purchased online or at Rock ‘N’ Robin’s for $30. FoCoMX is for all ages, with only a few venues exclusively 18+ or 21+.

CSU Bike Sharing Program

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Mar 272013
 

Author: Makenzie O’Keefe

[youtube]http://youtu.be/MsurWMupeBA[/youtube]

Sustainability and being green is something Colorado State University has always focused on. A new project being put into place by ASCSU and the city of Fort Collins will help our university withhold these environmental standards. CSU, being a bicycle friendly campus, is looking into working with the city of fort collins to implement a bike sharing network across the city. The primary goals of this project is to provide bicycles for students and resident of Fort Collins that will increase campus accessibility and hopefully relieve campus traffic.

This project will provide kiosks at bus stops and transit centers in which anyone can rent a bike to ride anywhere in Fort Collins. It will also include more bike racks on campus and the option to leave your bike in an overnight locker. With Meridian being closed, the possible on-campus stadium and a lack of student parking already, ASCSU hopes this project will help our university as well as maintain the image of being green. For CTV11, I’m Makenzie O’Keefe.

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MAX Benefit: New transit system to ease congestion in Fort Collins

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Mar 272013
 

Author: Kelsey Contouris

Let’s face it – getting around Fort Collins can be a pain sometimes. Whether by foot, bike, car or bus, we are often subject to inclement weather, detours and the all-too-common traffic jam. With the city’s population continuing to grow, the traffic will only get worse based on our current infrastructure. To fight the problem, the city’s transportation system is undergoing a major change: the addition of the MAX Bus Rapid Transit service.

A rendering of the completed system provides a sneak peek at what will come to be known as the University station and the "gateway" to Colorado State's campus. Photo courtesy of Max Bus Rapid Transit.

A rendering of the completed system provides a sneak peek at what will come to be known as the University station and the “gateway” to Colorado State’s campus. Photo courtesy of Max Bus Rapid Transit.

Projected to be up and running by May 2014, the MAX transit system will connect North and South Fort Collins via the Mason Corridor, making the whole of the city more readily accessible to residents on either end.

According to the City of Fort Collins website, there will be 12 boarding stations and two transit centers: one just south of Harmony Road and one just north of Laporte Avenue. A total of six accordion-style buses will travel up and down the Mason Corridor, arriving at stops every 10 minutes or so. Passengers can pay at ticket kiosks before boarding buses, giving MAX the convenience of a light rail system. Buses will run Monday through Saturday from 5 a.m. to midnight.

The MAX system will also be integrated with Fort Collins’ regular bus service, Transfort, according to the website. Claire Thomas, the public relations coordinator for the City of Fort Collins, said Transfort will adopt some of the technology that will be used by MAX, such as real-time bus arrival information. Transfort may also change its routes slightly to accommodate the MAX stations, making it easier for passengers to travel east or west from stops.

“It will really up their game,” Thomas said.

Re-routing residents through CSU's campus, construction crews have blocked off a section of Prospect Rd. in between College Ave. and Centre Ave. The closure is scheduled to last until April 14. Photo by Natasha Leadem.

Re-routing residents through CSU’s campus, construction crews have blocked off a section of Prospect Rd. in between College Ave. and Centre Ave. The closure is scheduled to last until April 14. Photo by Natasha Leadem.

Having a new mass transportation system that spans the majority of the city will also be of particular benefit to the CSU community. In addition to stopping at Prospect Road and Laurel Street, buses will stop on campus at a University Avenue station, which will be larger than others.

“There will be a larger plaza area with a berm and some landscaping and a boulder-wall seating area,” Thomas said. “There [will be] many more bike racks than any other station.”

The MAX Transit project also gives Fort Collins the unique opportunity to update the midtown area along College Avenue. There exists the potential for new student housing farther south along the MAX route, according to Thomas.

“We have all these free development opportunities,” she said. “We hope that housing developers will see these opportunities.”

Students  living off campus are looking forward to having an easier way to commute to CSU and travel around Fort Collins.

As the ninth stop on the Max Transit route, the Drake station will be located near Colorado State University's Veterinary Teaching Hospital and Animal Care Center. Photo courtesy of Max Bus Rapid Transit.

As the ninth stop on the Max Transit route, the Drake station will be located near Colorado State University’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital and Animal Care Center. Photo courtesy of Max Bus Rapid Transit.

“It would be perfect for transportation around here. I think it’s a good idea,” said Shawna Drewer, junior human dimensions and natural resources major.

With the MAX Transit route so close to campus, it’s a convenient ride for all students.

“I think it will present a lot more opportunity to live farther from campus,” said Amanda Guderjahn, junior business major. “I’ll probably use it a lot.”

Even on-campus students will experience the benefit. Freshman mathematics major Tristan Lee plans to live on campus again next year, and he said the MAX system will make it much easier to get around Fort Collins since he doesn’t drive a car.

“For going out with friends I think it would be a lot better because you could just walk across campus and take it,” Lee said.  “I’d really hate biking on College, so just being able to go right into Old Town would be nice.”

However, Lee would like to see MAX run later than its anticipated schedule.

“Lots of times when I go out with friends we end up going to a 24-hour place like IHOP,” he said. “So I guess for going out at night it wouldn’t really be the best thing.”

Visit fcgov.com/maxconstruction for weekly construction updates and more information about the MAX service.

Mar 192013
 

Author: Mary Willson

DSC_0450

Matt “P-Mann” Mahern and Lindsey O’brien of the Lindsey O’brien Band play at the SpokesBUZZ showcase. SpokesBUZZ put together the Colorado Music Party at SXSW in Austin, bringing together thousands of Colorado musicans and fans to support eachother at the festival.

 

The pattern of Fort Collins life is threaded with the staples of a classic Colorado experience: outdoor beauty, local beer, original bikes, and home-based bands.

With venues such as Aggie, Hodi’s Half Note, Avogadro’s Number, Surfside, Mishawaka, it is no

DSC_0259

Alana Rolfe of Fierce Bad Rabbit plays at the SpokesBUZZ showcase in Austin at SXSW. Fierce Bad Rabbit played multiple showcases over the week, and are alumni of SpokesBUZZ.

surprise that Fort Collins supports hundreds of homegrown bands.   With the jamming beats of locality also comes the responsibility of a celebratory community; which in the 970, there is no shortage of.

April kicks off with FoCoMX, leading into a summer of Beet Street festivities, and closing out with Bohemian Nights. Being an artist or band in town looks pretty good.

Yet, one of the most supportive outlets for local bands is a non-profit, volunteer-run music support and education organization, SpokesBUZZ.

“SpokesBUZZ raises global awareness of Fort Collins sound and culture by bringing worldwide attention to local bands,” according to the official mission.

“It has really two parts to it. In the big picture, it’s really a promotion engine for Fort Collins. Our job is to get the word out beyond our backyard about the great music scene we have here in Fort Collins, and on the grassroots level, help educate music and bands to be better in business,” said organization member, Julie Sutter. Sutter deals with communication and publicity for SpokesBUZZ as well as runs her own communication company, Unconventional Ink. “One of the things that we try to foster is ‘ look how much you can do together.’”

Only on its fourth year, the organization has fostered positivity in dozens of bands, as each goes through a program, in about two years. The current class envelopes 11 bands. As a SpokesBUZZ band, monthly seminars take place to learn the ins-and-outs of business, marketing, and other valuable skills needed to create a long lasting, successful band.

“You go from being kind of a garage band, to being a band that has a platform to actually do something. To me, its kind of a ticket to somewhere,” said James Yearling, singer, electric guitarist, co-writer and management of the band Better Than Bacon, a current SpokesBUZZ band. “We want to be advocates to SpokesBUZZ. Part of the bands’ role is honestly to be an advocate for our community and to keep the reputation high, and so outside of all the fun, there is a level of responsibility that all the bands really enjoy.”

James Yearling jams on his electric guitar with his band Better Than Bacon at SXSW in Austin.

James Yearling jams on his electric guitar with his band Better Than Bacon at SXSW in Austin.

The music incubator is a collaborative effort that brings forward all aspects of the community, outside of just musicians. Fans feel invested to SpokesBUZZ because the shows, events, and bands represent something bigger than just the music.

Dani Grant started the organization, and she also runs the Mishawaka and Chippers Lanes. The organization is supported through volunteer driven leadership, communication, skills and forte, and funded by community initatives such as New Belgium and Crowd Funding.

“What makes Fort Collins unique is that everyone is very humble, which is really exceptional to see,” said Chris Anderson of Fierce Bad Rabbit, an alumni of SpokesBUZZ. “People do it because they like it. Everyone is very supportive, yet everyone’s doing their own thing.”

As the bands headed off to South By South West (SXSW) in the middle of March, they are making their fifth journey into a mega-music sea, to promote the locality of Fort Collins. The beginnings of the organizations stem from SXSW, a mega festival, of over 128,000 attendees, according to SXSW.com.

“One of the things that we’ve discovered by going to Austin, it kind of feels like you’re a little fish in a big pond, but we’ve been able to bring so much of the community, beyond the music,” Sutter said. “What’s different about this year, we’ve actually made really great connections with the Denver community. It’s overwhelming, so you look for this connection, so the Colorado people gravitate to each other.”

This year, over a thousand Colorado-affiliated, music-passioned people are teaming up with SpokesBUZZ to celebrate Colorado music together through an official Colorado Music Party collaboration at SXSW, showing the progression from its first year of Fort Collins jamming out in Austin.

“At SXSW, it is just positive exposure for Fort Collins. I think a lot of people don’t realize what an amazing music base we have here,” said Nick Duarte, vocals and guitarists for Post Paradise. “It is really a team effort and everyone is working for the same goal, and they take it to Austin and say ‘hey look world, this is us.’”

The year ahead is fresh with SXSW SpokesBUZZ showcase behind, and a whole new journey to learn, explore and grow on. A new season for SpokesBUZZ is ahead, as a new class of bands is soon to join the team.

SpokesBUZZ puts on collaborative concerts, as well as supports the band’s and artist’s individual performances, so when the chance arises to check out a local band involved with this organization, a  larger picture is supported: the pattern that makes Fort Collins unique.

The threads of Fort Collins music are growing rapidly, and it is the responsibility of the community to keep this exciting pattern unfolding.

“Fort Collins does have a story to tell,” Sutter said. “When people hear ‘Colorado’, they may not think about Fort Collins, but that is changing.”

For more info on SpokesBUZZ, head over to spokesbuzz.org.

 

CTV Sports: March 11th, 2013

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Mar 112013
 

Author: Andrew Rodriguez

Tonight on CTV Sports we take a look at the last home game for mens basketball. We then take a look at our fan of week, a Track and Field athlete, updates on pro sports, weather, and on the popular segment in case you missed it, we look at some crazy sports video.

Check out CTV Sports at ctv11.collegian.com to get updates on the Mountain West Tournament in Las Vegas.

CTV News March 7, 2013

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Mar 072013
 

Author: Andrew Rodriguez

Tonight on CTV,  we take a look at Holocaust awareness week, an alternative spring break program and recycle mania.  We also take a look at the 7 day weather forecast and men’s basketball.

CTV News March 6, 2013: Fracking ban in Fort Collins passes

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Mar 062013
 

Author: Lena Howland

[youtube]http://youtu.be/T-yfUlOm4Ng[/youtube]

A ban on hydraulic-fracturing in Fort Collins passed last night with a vote of 5-2.  A gun-law at the state level is heating up, bringing protestors and advocates alike to the capital building.  An obesity awareness seminar in the LSC explores ways to keep healthy and fit.  Study abroad with Katie Spencer returns with another Italian adventure.  Entertainment with Christian Zamora, sports with Ryan Greene, and weather with Ashley Wallinger.  All this and more with your Wednesday CTV anchors Makenzie O’Keefe and Wayne Stafford.

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TEDx CSU Expanding Your Perspective

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Mar 052013
 

Author: Keith Albertson

[youtube]http://youtu.be/IZ8EnZiE9Wg[/youtube]
The Lory Student Center Theater at Colorado State University played host to eleven different speakers at the second annual TEDx-CSU conference on Saturday March 2nd. The theme of the event was “Expanding Your Perspective” and was sold out. Each speaker had about fifteen minutes to share their ideas which ranged from drawing meaning out of life, to a magician’s tricks. The videos of the speakers can be found at www.Ted.com

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The Land Down Under: An Australian Student’s Semester Abroad

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Mar 052013
 

Author: Anna Palmer

AustralianWith short, dark-brown, curly hair, 22-year-old Ellie Cooper sports a red silk skirt, black stockings and a knitted yellow scarf.  Her bright smile and easy-going mannerisms, coupled with the go-to phrase, “no worries,” warmly gives Cooper away as a cheerful and truly down-to-earth ‘Aussie’.

Though Cooper may be from “the land down under,” she currently resides in the college-town of Ft. Collins.  On “exchange” from Adelaide, Australia, the capital of South Australia, Cooper literally traveled halfway across the world to experience a new life for six months.

“I really love to travel,” she said. “I love my hometown, but it is too small for me. You learn so much about a place when you go stay for an extended period of time.”

Being that Colorado State University was one of the 10 institutions Cooper could choose from, she took into account what would work best with her degree.  As a journalism major, the upheld reputation of the Journalism and Technical Communication Department at CSU stood out to her.

“Ft. Collins looked so pretty and there was so much to do and see, and it seemed easy to get around,” Cooper said, with a glint of excitement in her eyes. “I live right by the beach back home so it was nice to come to a place so close to the mountains.”

Staying in Ft. Collins for only a semester, she hopes to take advantage of her travel time in the United States.  With Washington D.C. on her radar, she notes that her interest in U.S. politics was one of the determining factors that swayed her over studying abroad in Europe.

Outlining her travel itinerary, Cooper plans to go to San Francisco, Cali., over spring break for an Indie music festival.  Her parents are coming to visit after the semester ends to travel together to New York and Chicago before she continues her solo journey up the East Coast into Canada.

Currently Cooper lives in a house with Americans as well as other exchange students.  She enjoys being able to observe the American perspective, especially when it comes to politics.

Bearing this in mind, one apparent difference between the two countries comes to mind: the “right” and “wrong” side of the road.  However, she highlights one drastic difference in particular: the weather.

Upon leaving Australia in 120-degree heat, Cooper, wearing her heavy winter coat, lugged her lone survival backpacker’s bag full of winter clothes onto the plane.

“I’m not used to the constant cold,” Cooper said. “I saw snow fall for the first time [here].  It was such a pretty, white powder.  I ran to tell my roommates and was like, ‘Guys, it’s snowing!’ They were like ‘we know’, like it was completely normal. As soon as it’s slightly warm, everyone’s wearing t-shirts and flip flops and I’m still all bundled up. I guess you have to make the most of a warm day here.”

Another slight difference Cooper has stumbled upon is that of the food and bar scene.  Though corporations like McDonalds and KFC have become ubiquitous globally, permeating into countries including Australia, there are slight differences in food choices and availability.  She notes that there’s “heaps” of international cuisine in Fort Collins.  In particular, there is more Mexican food here, not that she has any complaints with her newfound love of burritos.

“I do miss Vegemite,” Cooper said, vouching for the staple of any Aussie diet. “I’m waiting for my care package to come because it has Vegemite in it.  It’s definitely an acquired taste.”

In regards to the bar scene in Ft. Collins, Cooper gave her two cents.  The Trailhead Tavern in Old Town was the first bar she visited, and she immediately noticed all the TVs, pool tables and beer, calling it “so American.”

“The bars here are more quirky, a bit older, in a good way,” Cooper said. “They have character.  Our bars are very modern with strobe lights. The bars close early here.  Back home they stay open till 5 a.m., sometimes even 10 a.m.”

Stemming off of this difference, drink specials are pretty much non-existent in Australia.  In fact, the Australian government is considering doing-away with “happy hour” due to the increasingly high levels of intoxication.  There is more control in Australia, Cooper commented.

“[Almost] no one in Australia has guns.  It is really difficult to get a permit.  I felt naughty because I held a gun for the first time here,” she said, hiding a smile.

In terms of her experience interacting with Americans, Cooper rates it as being a positive one, commenting on the friendliness and helpful nature of CSU students in particular.

While abroad and despite all the new and exciting things Cooper doesn’t “normally get to do,” she does keep in contact with friends and family halfway across the globe via Facebook and Skype.  Mentioning that the only time she felt homesick was when she had the flu, she makes the point that “six months goes so quickly” and to take advantage of the time she has here.

“[So far], I’ve only seen Ft. Collins and Denver.  I love Old Town though,” Cooper said, as her mind drifted back to a pivotal point in her time abroad. “A couple of days after I had just arrived, I was tired and jet-lagged.  I had just got a bike so I road down to Old Town with other exchange students.  The lights came on and it was awesome.  It was the first time I knew I had done the right thing by coming here.”