Too School for Cool: Is North Korea making you fat?

 Blogs, The Well, Too School for Cool  Comments Off on Too School for Cool: Is North Korea making you fat?
Apr 262013
 

Author: Allison LeCain

Fresh vegetables are important components of a...

Fresh vegetables are important components of a healthy diet. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I recently watched a documentary called Hungry for Change. It’s a film about healthy, natural eating and what effects it can have on a person’s lifestyle.

I’d like to start by saying that my friends and I watch a lot of documentaries, like A LOT. If you have Netflix, you’ll understand. Over my many viewings I’ve learned various things about the film industry, sushi, war, and food, but Hungry for Change is the first documentary that has truly inspired me to make a change in my life.

I’m not an unhealthy person – I’m not overweight, I don’t eat a lot of junk food or sugar, and soda is not a part of my diet. The lifestyle change outlined in the film isn’t about weight for me. It’s about putting things in my body that will help my energy, skin, and organs in the long-run.

The diet idea that the film presents is that people should not eat any foods that have additives and chemicals. All foods we consume should be found naturally in the wild. If there’s an ingredient you can’t pronounce, it doesn’t belong in your body. This is how our bodies were made to eat, so why shouldn’t we honor that?

Hungry for Change reveals secrets that the food industry doesn’t want you to know, such as addictive food additives. Many people crave sugar or salt on a weekly, or even daily, basis. That’s because some companies put in artificial ingredients that act like nicotine to make you want more. The reality is, if we stop eating those foods, our body will quickly learn to live without them and we will stop craving them.

The film interviews people who have survived cancer and obesity due to changing their diet. As I said before, I’m not unhealthy, but I do get frequent headaches and bouts of stress. The documentary explains that when people are stressed, they tend to eat. That is the opposite of what a person should do to control stress levels.

The fact is, there are a lot of stresses in our world today. Our country is in constant fear of being bombed, our economy is still at a halt, and school work piles up to an uncontrollable level. In our world today, stress is all around us. By eating natural, organic foods, you can be sure that whatever you’re putting into your body is helping your overall health and wellbeing.

 

Learn more about Hungry for Change at http://www.hungryforchange.tv/

How CSU students can eat healthy on a budget

 News  Comments Off on How CSU students can eat healthy on a budget
Apr 172013
 

Author: Makenzie O’Keefe

[youtube]http://youtu.be/shDvPMUxmn8[/youtube]

Most college students have a small budget and the last thing they want to spend their money on is groceries. But who knew it is actually very simple to eat healthy on a budget if you’re willing to prepare it? The Kendall Anderson Nutrition Center at Colorado State University can help educate students that eating healthy is obtainable even as a poor college student.

Their list to eat healthy for cheaper started with the idea to cut meat out of your diet when possible, choosing eggs or tofu as cheaper protein substitutes. A fun idea to accomplish this is eating breakfast for dinner. The Nutrition Center also suggested purchasing in bulk, cooking and baking your own snacks and treats to avoid chemicals and processed foods, making unique but cheap sandwiches, and purchasing fruits and vegetables that aren’t already precut and packaged.

Most students are unaware of how to eat healthy with limited budgets, drawing them to Ramen Noodles and other processed foods. Eating healthy is essential to our performance and future, so students should educate themselves about the option to eat healthy on a budget. The more you are willing to prepare and search in the grocery store, the healthier options you will find at a cheaper price.

The new Durrell Express, T-DEX: what you need to know

 The Munchies, The Well  Comments Off on The new Durrell Express, T-DEX: what you need to know
Oct 102012
 

Author: Jack Krause

Photo by Jack Krause.

With the closure for construction of the Durrell Resource Center, the usual dining spot for those in the tower dorms, a new prospect has arisen. It goes by T-DEX, and it brings with it new dangers to the infamous freshmen fifteen. The building is an industrial shack with a kitchen which creates the hot food, while the greens and a la carté items are delivered from RAMWICH. Though the food may taste good, the CSU Dining Calculator shows the food for what it really is, which is full of calories and fat.

One cheeseburger from T-DEX contains 440 calories and also 23 grams of fat. That right there is equal to half of an average person’s intake of fat in one day, and that is only half of one meal. T-DEX allows its patrons to have two main dishes and a side as one of the meal options. The pizza is just as unhealthy, containing 595 calories and 25 grams of fat, and a F’Real vanilla shake contains 550 calories and 23 grams of fat.

CSU offers a nutritional chart which lets you make a meal and tells you all the information on what you’re eating.

CSU Dining Calculator