Everyday Explorations: CSU’s Forestry and Natural Resources Buildings

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May 082013
 

Author: Kelsey Contouris

If there’s one thing I learned from this week’s exploration, it’s that bridges make buildings infinitely more awesome. I originally set out to explore Forestry, but when I found the second-floor bridge to Natural Resources, I couldn’t resist. And seeing as this is my last post of the semester, I figured the bigger the exploration the better.

A large variety of leaves and branches are on display near Forestry's main entrance.

A large variety of leaves and branches are on display near Forestry’s main entrance.

With the trees around campus finally sprouting their leaves, it felt like a good time to check out the forestry building. I went in through the main entrance off of West Drive and was greeted by a shockingly new space for a building constructed in 1937. The walls were painted a pleasant, soft green; the hallway floors were done in a shiny, beige wood with stone tile running along the edges; round, modern light fixtures hung from the crown-molded ceiling down the length of the main hallway. This was quite possibly one of the newest old spaces on campus that I’ve had the pleasure of viewing.

This second-floor bridge is a convenient way to travel between Forestry and Natural Resources.

This second-floor bridge is a convenient way to travel between Forestry and Natural Resources.

Immediately to my left and right were hallways lined with tiled squares displaying the preserved leaves of probably a couple hundred plant species. After admiring some of these, I ventured down the main hallway. Old black and white photos hung on the walls in sharp contrast with a large TV screen displaying department information.

As I was busy taking pictures, someone came in through the front doors. Fearing that he would ask me what I was doing or if I was lost, I scurried around the nearest corner and happened upon the basement steps.

Not wanting to turn around and look more lost, I decided I might as well check it out. It was a strange space that seemed more like a basement you would find in a normal house. The ceilings were much lower than in the rest of the building, and they were crowded with an unsettling array of pipes that led into a room with even more unsettling building guts. The rest of the space served as storage.

I crept back up to the first floor and found a stairway leading to the second. These hallways looked a bit older, with the exception of the nice wood and tile floors. I was surprised to find that even the classrooms in Forestry looked newly renovated.

The second floor was unexciting until I remembered that from the outside I had seen a bridge connecting Forestry with the Warner College of Natural Resources. A woman I saw in the hallway pointed me in that direction.

Eagerly, I walked through the two metal doors out onto the bridge. The north side had windows, but the south side was open and provided an excellent view of Sherwood Forest and the sidewalk below. I drank in the fresh air for a moment and continued on into Natural Resources.

The main entrance area of Natural Resources has many earthy qualities.

The main entrance area of Natural Resources has many earthy qualities.

I explored the second floor for a bit, noting that the classrooms looked much older than those in Forestry. The walls were covered with all sorts of maps and posters, and display cases were filled with weathered equipment and geological artifacts.

I went up to the third floor through one of the cavernous concrete stairwells. It was up here that I got the best view of the front entryway. The space is somewhat difficult to describe – industrial, yet earthy. Cold, yet inviting. I think I got this feeling from the concrete coupled with the more natural elements. A small garden and pond sat beneath the gray, twisting staircase; sunlight filled the space from skylights up above; dark wood covered some walls, while others were covered in jagged stone bricks. A collection of tables and chairs sat below, and I realized that this would be a great place to come and relax.

I toured a few more hallways and decided to end my double exploration. Judging Forestry and Natural Resources from the outside, I had never expected to find what I did on the inside. The same has been true for all of the buildings I explored this semester. They’re all on the same campus, yet so wildly different from one another. The best part is that even though I’ve seen so many buildings, there are still so many left to discover.

CSU showcases student achievement

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May 022013
 

Author: Kelsey Peterson

[youtube]http://youtu.be/_6SHq773xQs[/youtube]

The Celebrate Undergraduate Research and Creativity showcase crowded the Lory Student Center Theatre at Colorado State University May 30. All CSU undergraduate students are encouraged to submit research or creative works that are then featured at the showcase and judged by three different judges. Students showed off their achievements and winners were awarded from the various events. For more information visit http://curc.colostate.edu/.

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Everyday Explorations: CSU’s Education Building

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May 012013
 

Author: Kelsey Contouris

Unless you study education or social work, the education building is probably just one of those buildings that you often walk past on your way to classes. But what lies within those weathered, vine-covered walls? The question had been nagging at me for much of the semester as I passed by the building on my way to Clark C, so I finally decided it was time to go exploring.

The cozy lounge area lies on the north side of the second floor overlooking the Eddy lawn.

The cozy lounge area lies on the north side of the second floor overlooking the Eddy lawn.

I entered the education building through the door on the west side, which I quickly realized was not a main entrance. I found myself in a white concrete stairwell, not sure where to begin my journey. Tentatively, I walked up to the second floor, figuring I would start from the top and work my way down.

Like many of the older academic buildings on campus, the inside was mostly filled with offices and small classrooms – nothing too exciting. These hallways felt especially school-like to me, though – the office doors had cute comics and signs on them, poster projects hung on the walls and colorful bulletin boards advertised department news. Perhaps aspiring teachers can get used to their future work environment while still in college.

I also found a quaint lounge area on the second floor – every building on campus seems to have one. Large windows overlooked the grassy area between Education and Eddy, and clusters of cozy-looking chairs filled either side of the space. There was even a small kitchen in the hallway right before the lounge area. It all felt very homey.

The lounge area also had a staircase in it, so I took that down to the first floor. As I explored, I found more classrooms and offices, but these were mainly related to the department of social work. I also found what must be the front entrance to the building (on the south side) – the space was filled with tables and chairs, a couple of computers and signs for navigating the building. Finding nothing else of note, I went down to the basement, but it turned out to be even less exciting – mainly just stark, white walls and a handful of classrooms.

Two of the benches on the north side of the building memorialize Sean William McGowan, who was a freshman in 2011.

Two of the benches on the north side of the building memorialize Sean William McGowan, who was a freshman in 2011.

It was the outside of Education that I found most intriguing. You’ve probably seen the east side – a few tables and chairs sit in front of a waterfall feature near the side of the building, and students can often be found hanging out there when the weather is nice. The wooden benches on the north side are also a somewhat popular place to relax, and I also noticed that they’re memorials to a couple of people who have passed away. I think it’s a touching gesture, and now I’m curious about whether or not the other benches on campus serve the same purpose.

I snapped a few more pictures of the north side of Education (and the random primate painted under one of the windows) and went on my way. While I probably won’t have a reason to go in there again, at least it’s now something more to me than just another building I pass by. Hopefully this will be true for all or most of the campus buildings by the time I graduate – I just have to keep exploring.

Equine Reproduction Lab

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Apr 302013
 

Author: Keith Albertson

[youtube]http://youtu.be/RoWTKDwDoxo[/youtube]

The grand opening for the Colorado State University Equine Reproduction Lab on April 26, 2013 was a celebration of the new building. It was built to replace the old one that burned down in July 2011. The new lab cost $3.6 million. The building is a tool for drawing more interest in CSU’s popular Equine Science Department.

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CTV Sports: April 29th, 2013

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Apr 292013
 

Author: Andrew Rodriguez

On the last CTV Sports for the Spring semester, we take a look at CSU mens baseball, lacrosse, and track and field.  We also talk about the NFL draft and Denver Nuggets.  Annie Dumbauld takes a look at the 7 day weather forecast.  And finally on In Case You Missed It, we take a look at some of the best sports moments from the last 4 years.

BREAKING: Police Tear Gas Breaks Up CSU Block Party

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Apr 272013
 

Author: Dillon Thomas

In a new short video obtained by CTV11, quick clips of the CSU Block Party are compiled.  Reports say that an estimated 700 people attended the party, which took place only five minutes away from the CSU campus.

 

The video also shows partygoers climbing light poles, dancing on top of homes, and jumping on cars.

 

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mlQeqyZphuM[/youtube]

 

Original Video & Picture:

 

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MP0gYevVo4w[/youtube]

Too School for Cool: Is North Korea making you fat?

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Apr 262013
 

Author: Allison LeCain

Fresh vegetables are important components of a...

Fresh vegetables are important components of a healthy diet. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I recently watched a documentary called Hungry for Change. It’s a film about healthy, natural eating and what effects it can have on a person’s lifestyle.

I’d like to start by saying that my friends and I watch a lot of documentaries, like A LOT. If you have Netflix, you’ll understand. Over my many viewings I’ve learned various things about the film industry, sushi, war, and food, but Hungry for Change is the first documentary that has truly inspired me to make a change in my life.

I’m not an unhealthy person – I’m not overweight, I don’t eat a lot of junk food or sugar, and soda is not a part of my diet. The lifestyle change outlined in the film isn’t about weight for me. It’s about putting things in my body that will help my energy, skin, and organs in the long-run.

The diet idea that the film presents is that people should not eat any foods that have additives and chemicals. All foods we consume should be found naturally in the wild. If there’s an ingredient you can’t pronounce, it doesn’t belong in your body. This is how our bodies were made to eat, so why shouldn’t we honor that?

Hungry for Change reveals secrets that the food industry doesn’t want you to know, such as addictive food additives. Many people crave sugar or salt on a weekly, or even daily, basis. That’s because some companies put in artificial ingredients that act like nicotine to make you want more. The reality is, if we stop eating those foods, our body will quickly learn to live without them and we will stop craving them.

The film interviews people who have survived cancer and obesity due to changing their diet. As I said before, I’m not unhealthy, but I do get frequent headaches and bouts of stress. The documentary explains that when people are stressed, they tend to eat. That is the opposite of what a person should do to control stress levels.

The fact is, there are a lot of stresses in our world today. Our country is in constant fear of being bombed, our economy is still at a halt, and school work piles up to an uncontrollable level. In our world today, stress is all around us. By eating natural, organic foods, you can be sure that whatever you’re putting into your body is helping your overall health and wellbeing.

 

Learn more about Hungry for Change at http://www.hungryforchange.tv/

CSU exposes human trafficking

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Apr 252013
 

Author: Kelsey Peterson

[youtube]http://youtu.be/HrWwv_n50T8[/youtube]

According to Colorado State University awareness group, No More Injustice, there are more slaves now than any point in history, 50 percent of which are children. Apr. 26-27 No More Injustice will be putting on a human trafficking simulation called “Enslaved” in the effort to eradicate modern day slavery. Participants will walk through three rooms: a brothel, a garment factory and a child soldier scene. Due to the graphic content of simulation, participants must be 18 years of age and are required to sign a waver before the event. The event will go from to 2-8 p.m. both days and the simulation lasts approximately 20 minutes. This event is free and will be held in the East Ballroom of the Lory Student Center.

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Everyday Explorations: CSU’s Visual Arts Building

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Apr 242013
 

Author: Kelsey Contouris

It’s gray. Dreary. Dull.

From the outside, that is.

The west entrance of the Visual Arts building

The west entrance of the Visual Arts building

The Visual Arts building may not appear to be the ideal place for fostering imagination, but the inside tells a different story. Just walking through the main stretch of the building, you’ll find an impressive array of artwork on display – drawings, paintings, sculptures, pottery, photography, you name it.

Constructed in 1974, Visual Arts stands on the south side of Pitkin Street across from Braiden Hall. The sprawling complex is home to a number of classrooms, studios and workshops where students can build and master their artistic skills. Having enjoyed art classes in high school, I was particularly excited for this week’s exploration.

Colorful pipes run along the ceiling in the main hallway.

Colorful pipes run along the ceiling in the main hallway.

I entered the building through the west doors as several other students were making their way to 8 a.m. classes. Again realizing that I would look like a strange tourist for taking pictures in front of everyone, I cut into a hallway off to my right until traffic died down. It wasn’t the most spectacular first impression – just a bunch of lockers, offices and some studios. It actually reminded me very much of the art hallway in the high school I attended freshman year.

This thought struck me again as I toured other parts of the building – the slanted skylights, exposed pipes zigzagging across the ceiling, quaint courtyards outside and numerous projects lining the walls were all eerily familiar. If my high school’s art department were to take over the rest of the building, this is what it would look like.

Paintings line the walls.

Paintings line the walls.

As I made my way down the main corridor, I noticed a sign directing students to room F113, which, oddly enough, is where one of my journalism classes will be next semester. I followed the signs past some more offices and classrooms only to find an average-sized lecture hall, pointlessly far away from the rest of my classes next semester. At least I can look forward to admiring some of the artwork while I’m in the building.

I continued down the main stretch, snapping photos of some paintings and pottery. I passed a small counter called the Sova Cafe, which advertised bagels, cookies, coffee and more. I imagined what the place must look like on a normal afternoon – students hanging out on the hallway benches or lounging in the courtyards outside, probably drawing in sketchbooks as they have lunch. Being an art student in this building must be pretty nice.

Even the landscaping is artsy.

Even the landscaping is artsy.

I eventually came to another entrance area facing Pitkin Street. An old, red telephone booth stood by the doors, as well as a wiry sculpture of a human body. As I kept walking down the hall, I saw a few weathered pieces of art equipment and more projects filling display cases. I came to the east doors and turned right into a hallway containing more drawings, lockers and studios. I was amazed at how tall the studio doors were – they practically went up to the ceiling!

After I took a few more photos, my exploration was over. I was pleasantly surprised to find such a vibrant, artsy environment inside that cold, gray brick exterior. If you have time to check out the visual arts building, or if you end up with a miscellaneous lecture there, I’m sure you won’t be disappointed with what you see.