Summer abroad, don’t mind if I do

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Apr 162013
 

Author: Cassandra Whelihan

It’s been nearly three years since Rebecca Robinson last took off to travel the world. The expression on her face as she

Rebecca Robinson experiencing the culture of Edinburgh, Scotland. Photo courtesy of Rebecca Robinson.

Rebecca Robinson experiencing the culture of Edinburgh, Scotland. Photo courtesy of Rebecca Robinson.

describes her summer plans for Florence, Italy radiates pure excitement.

“I traveled by myself at 19 which was almost three years ago and you get the travel bug the first time you really go out on your own. It doesn’t go away, you’ll be infected with it your whole life and so I’m like, ‘yeah I really wanted to go to Italy.’ I really wanted to live in Italy and just experience it rather than jumping from place to place,” said Rebecca Robinson, a journalism and history double major. “You learn so much about yourself — you learn how much strength you actually have to be independent and to do things on your own. You realize the skills you can pull on when crisis happens, when you get lost. Leaving Colorado is just a really good opportunity to grow as a person, I suggest it for everyone.”

Also leaving Colorado for the summer, Jennifer Robinson prepares to embark on an adventure to Freiburg, Germany. Jennifer Robinson will be practicing her German while taking roughly 12 credit hours.

“We are supposed to speak in German the entire time we are there,” said Jennifer Robinson, a senior German language and international studies double major. “I think that immersing myself in the culture is going to help my speaking skills a lot. So instead of taking these courses at CSU I’m taking them in Germany. I think that I’m going to learn a little more.”

The Study Abroad Program at CSU offers opportunities to travel to almost any country in the world. According to their website, with approval, you may also study abroad through an unaffiliated program or enroll directly at a foreign university.

“We have programs in Prague, in Costa Rica, in Ireland, Japan, in Morocco, in the Bahamas, in Italy — I mean the list goes on. There are some things like advanced language courses in Spain for people studying Spanish or there’s things like criminology or criminal justice in Prague,” said Kayla Rivers, finance major and peer adviser at the Study Abroad Office. “I think summer programs in particular are really important for students who feel like they can’t fit it into their academic schedule, but who want to have that experience and want to be able to see this new country and experience a new culture.”

Mona Lisa frameless

Mona Lisa frameless (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The opportunity to be immersed in the history of unique cultures around the world is extremely moving and powerful, according to Rebecca Robinson.

“When I saw the Mona Lisa in the Louvre Museum about three years ago, I was just balling my eyes out because I was just so overwhelmed by ‘you know this is actually da Vinci’s Mona Lisa. This is the real deal. I’m standing in the same room as this masterpiece that was painted centuries before by someone I deeply admire,’” said Rebecca. “I’m really excited. I get to see the ‘Birth of Venus’ at the Uffizi Gallery and the Statue of David, so those are like the top two art things in Florence I’m excited about.”

Going Green: Recycling in your community

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Apr 152013
 

Author: Allison LeCain

Colorado State University Flag

Colorado State University Flag (Photo credit: tylerkron)

Colorado State University is considered a ‘green’ university, but it wasn’t always that way. In the past 15 years, CSU’s recycling rate has gone from 26 percent to 57 percent, ranking in the top 5 percent of recycle-friendly universities in America for the past 10 years, according to RecycleMania.

We’ve adopted changes over the years that make recycling easier, such as single-stream recycling, trash audits and participating in RecycleMania. Now CSU recycles almost two million pounds each year, according to CSU’s green website.

What is RecycleMania?

RecycleMania is a nation-wide competition that promotes recycling and waste-reduction at universities. The event takes place over eight weeks each spring. Recycling and trash is measured on a per-capita basis each week. CSU took 16th place out of 630 universities last year.

During this time, there’s an on-campus competition between residence halls and university apartments to see which have the best recycling rate. Each RecycleMania starts off with a trash audit. A day’s worth of trash is collected from all residence halls and sorted. Last year’s audit revealed that 75 percent of what was thrown away was trash and 25 percent could have been recycled, according to Sheela Backen, CSU’s Integrated Solid Waste Program Manager.

How CSU went ‘green’

In the ’80s, CSU didn’t have a single-stream recycling system. Nearly all materials were trashed in a landfill. In 1990, CSU received a $26,000 grant from the Colorado Office of Energy Conservation that allowed them to start a new recycling program, called Recycle Colorado State. Since then, the number of dumpsters has been cut in half and the first automated recycling truck was purchased. CSU switched to single-stream recycling in 2007, making the recycling rate go up to 57 percent.

Backen has taken the lead role in changing the way faculty and students view sustainability on campus. She focuses on educating students so they know what to recycle and care enough to do so. One of the common misconceptions she says students have about recycling is pizza boxes. She said as long as you clean the pizza out of it, the boxes can be recycled, as can bottles and their caps.

Though the recycling rate is rising, Backen thinks the university can do even more for sustainability.

“One of the things I really want to work on is compost,” Backen said. “We’re already doing some compost, but we can expand into paper towels and stuff like that to take more stuff out of the landfills. Every year they’re supposed to add another commodity we can recycle in Larimer County – anything that they’ll add, we’ll add.”

How does recycling work?

According to Backen, the recycling starts out in bins around campus. The custodial staff empties those into larger bins outside, which are picked up by trucks. Trucks pick up recycling daily from Lory Student Center and two to three times a week for other buildings. Those trucks take the recyclables to the Larimer County Landfill, where they have an Intermediate Processing Center. There the material is bailed and shipped to Denver’s Waste Management plant. Then a machine uses electric eyes to sort the recyclables.

“They can tell a white piece of paper from a pink piece of paper – it’s really neat,” Backen said. “They use magnets for steel cans and blow air at the aluminum cans to pop them over into where they want them.”

At the end of the machine’s line, there are people pulling out materials that are not suited for recycling. Backen said the recycling process costs more because of the trash people throw in. She suggests taking the time to rinse recyclables of food material so they make it through the recycling inspection.

What can you recycle at CSU?

  • Clean #1 through #7 plastic bottles, tubes, containers
  • Glass bottles and jars
  • Aluminum and steel cans
  • Metal jar lids and bottle caps
  • Empty aerosol cans
  • Aluminum foil
  • Newspapers and magazines
  • Office paper
  • Phone books
  • Corrugated cardboard
  • Brown paper grocery bags
  • Paperboard
  • Some electronics upon request

National recycling rate according to Fort Collins Government

Aluminum cans 51.2%
Glass Bottles 22.0%
Steel Cans 62.0%

 

Living out the legacy

By working hard to educate future students and faculty, the recycling rate will continue to grow and CSU will become a waste-free campus.

“If we’re composting, and giving the compost back to our grounds people, we’re completing that loop so everything that we create on campus is used on campus,” Backen said.

In knowing what to recycling, the CSU community can reach this goal in 20 years, Backen explained.

“People just need to concentrate on what they’re doing – they just need to get it into the right bin.”

 

Mar 052013
 

Author: Ricki Watkins

What does it feel like to have the entire community supporting your great idea? Or, how does it feel to donate to a great cause and get some cool swag in return? Well, it feels like Community Funded.

Photo courtesy of Community Funded.

Photo courtesy of Community Funded.

Community Funded, a Fort Collins-based company, helps individuals, for-profit and nonprofit organizations and groups connect to the people within their community to raise money for worthwhile causes.

How does it work exactly? Well,say the owner of a small business wants to expand but does not have the money to do so. After submitting an idea to CF and having it approved, the owner has a certain number of days to raise a set amount of money. Individuals and organizations can then go to CF’s website and learn more about the proposed project. If they like the project, they can choose to either donate money to the cause or purchase what CF terms as “giftbacks.” Giftbacks are either products or services donated by the project creator — “project giftbacks” — or by other organizations — “in-kind giftbacks.” For example, you can buy a case of Odell beer or a Mugs Coffee Lounge gift card and donate to the project at the same time.

If the project creator is for-profit and makes their fundraising goal within the timeframe, they get to keep the money they raise. If not, the donations are returned back to the donors. If the project creator is a nonprofit, regardless of whether they meet their fundraising goal or not, they receive the money raised.

“We really set out to build this tool that helps people create awareness of good ideas while uniting a community,” said McCabe Callahan, CF co-founder and owner of Mugs Coffee Lounge.

Callahan, along with co-founders Blue Hovatter and Ryan Stover, built CF off of existing crowdfunding websites. What sets them apart is that instead of fundraising to a faceless crowd, the founders wanted to focus on community.

“What defines you is really the relationships you have in your life,” Callahan said. “If you have heard the saying ‘It takes a village to raise a child,’ I think it really takes a community to make a great idea happen.”

Individuals and organizations have raised almost $290,000 for their projects through CF since the company’s launch a little less than a year ago.

 

Photo courtesy of Community Funded.

Photo courtesy of Community Funded.

What’s your ‘it’?

And remember that small business owner that wanted to expand? Well, meet Charly Clifford. Owner of Charly Bar, an energy bar company, Clifford utilized Community Funded and raised over $15,000 within his timeframe.

Charly Bar is Clifford’s “it” as CF says. What is an “it”? According to CF, your “it” is what you’re passionate about.

“We like to ask people, ‘What’s your it?’ because no matter what ‘it’ is, it can be Community Funded,” said Stover, who is also CF’s Creative Director.

“Times are crazy right now with money, and loans are not necessarily the best way to go about things, especially if you are not tried and true and you just want to try something and you don’t want to necessarily jump off the deep end and get a big loan and have to pay that back forever,” Clifford said.

Clifford, who donates one percent of his profits to youth health and wellness programs, has already moved to a new kitchen and purchased new equipment with some of the money he raised.

“I am looking forward to growing the business and having a lot more community impact,” Clifford said.

What is Stacy Sebeczek’s ‘it’? The Fort Collins Bike Library, where anyone can checkout a bike for free. As director of the Bike Library, Sebeczek was looking for some way to find funding for 2013, as the Bike Library’s five-year federal grant would be expiring in December 2012.

Through CF, the Bike Library raised $10,000. Coupled with contributions from New Belgium, the City of Fort Collins and the Downtown Development Authority, the Bike Library raised enough money to keep its doors open for 2013.

“It raised a ton of awareness for our cause,” Sebeczek said. “Part of our transition after funding ran out in 2012 was not just a simple ‘we need some money to operate next year,’ it was a very comprehensive ‘we are transitioning from a grant-dependent model to something that is more sustainable with community collaboration.’ So, it was important for us to use that community piece for the awareness and exposure of our cause … Community Funded really helped us with that, especially having their strong team behind it; it is a very passionate group of individuals and they are so well connected and so willing to push projects and help them get the exposure they need.”

 

How do I get involved?

So, you are a college student, how can you get involved with CF? In three ways, according to Callahan.

One, you can support ideas and projects in your community by donating or buying giftbacks — you get some sweet swag that you were already going to buy, but now that money goes to a great cause.

“It is a great way for students to support great ideas and community while getting something back in exchange because a lot of students don’t have disposable income and a lot are tight with money and have student loans,” Callahan said. “So, instead of feeling like you have to come up with this extra money, what Community Funded allows for is this ability to shop for things you are going to use and do anyways, but also having impact in your community, which is a cool feeling to know that you are actually causing things to happen.”

Two, if you have a great idea, shout it out and use Community Funded to make that idea reality.

“Whether it is a class project or a big goal that they have in life, it is an opportunity to share what they are passionate about and get the support of the people that already support them,” Stover said.

Speaking from experience, Clifford said he believes having the support of your community is extremely motivational.

“It’s a lot of encouragement just to know that people believe in what you are doing … it makes you want to go out and try harder, it gives you definitely something to strive for,” Clifford said.

Three, spread the word.

“Just because you can’t fund a project actually and you don’t want to start one, doesn’t mean you don’t see a good idea like the Bike Library and be willing to talk about it,” Callahan said. “By talking about it, you are also supporting that project, so you become this hero, this cheerleader for the different ideas on the website.”

Bottom line: “Even you can have impact on your community through tools like this,” Callahan said.

 

The future of CF

What is the future for CF? Growth and greater impact.

“Fort Collins is definitely community-centric and it is full of big ideas and people that are passionate about creating change in the world, so it definitely makes sense that it started in Fort Collins — it was fertile soil for this kind of idea, but really, the next step to this is to grow this outside of Fort Collins and really become a national movement,” Stover said.

With more than 2,000 registered individuals and almost 400 registered organizations from all over the U.S., and growing, it looks like CF is well on its way to success.

“My hope is that as many people that need to use it, use it to cause greater impacts in their communities and if that is worldwide, I am okay with that,” Callahan said.

 

 

Stopping Childhood Hunger One Student at a Time

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Mar 052013
 

Author: Nicolle Fagan

peppers

No Kid Hungry is a CSU chapter that focuses on helping children have food. Photo by Lauren Martin

There are roughly 75 million children in the United States. Of that number, 16 million kids live under the poverty line and, despite living in one of the richest countries in the world, one in five children in America struggle with hunger.

A new student organization on campus is trying to bring awareness to the Fort Collins community of the hunger epidemic plaguing the nation. No Kid Hungry is a student chapter of the national organization of the same name.

“We are a group of students who are advocating and fundraising for the national non-profit No Kid Hungry,” said Mindy Campbell, president of the student organization. “We do anything from volunteering to asking for donations to spreading the word about hunger in America.”

The national non-profit pledged to end childhood hunger by 2015 by educating families, changing legislation, and bringing national awareness to the problem. For the past eight years, the organization connects kids to nutrition programs, like school breakfast and summer meals, and empowers low-income families to stretch their food budgets to get their children nutritious meals at home.

CSU’s chapter of No Kid Hungry started early last semester to assist the national organization’s goals in Northern Colorado. Despite a small membership, the group has large plans to improve the local community.

“This semester we are looking into bake sales and a restaurant crawl,” said Recruiting and Marketing Officer Jessie Salus. The restaurant crawl would involve participants visiting local restaurants to sample food for a small cost. All proceeds would be donated to No Kid Hungry. “We are also looking into a food recovery program, but that one is unfortunately on halt right now.”

In addition to their planned events, No Kid Hungry volunteers with established organizations La Familia and the Growing Project. Like any other start-up organization, the biggest challenge is gaining campus awareness and motivating students to participate.

To get involved, interested students can find No Kid Hungry on RamLink or email Mindy Campbell at mindy4nkh@gmail.com. The group meets every other Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. at Momo Lolo’s Coffee House off W. Elizabeth St.

The rewards from joining No Kid Hungry are undeniable for Vice President Sarah Ehrlicher. “[No Kid Hungry] allows us to be a part of Fort Collins community,” said Ehrlicher. “And it lets us tackle the problems where we can see them.”

The problem of childhood hungry is here: in America, in Colorado and in Fort Collins.

“It’s not that hard to make a difference,” said Campbell. “This is a problem we can fix.”

The Land Down Under: An Australian Student’s Semester Abroad

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Mar 052013
 

Author: Anna Palmer

AustralianWith short, dark-brown, curly hair, 22-year-old Ellie Cooper sports a red silk skirt, black stockings and a knitted yellow scarf.  Her bright smile and easy-going mannerisms, coupled with the go-to phrase, “no worries,” warmly gives Cooper away as a cheerful and truly down-to-earth ‘Aussie’.

Though Cooper may be from “the land down under,” she currently resides in the college-town of Ft. Collins.  On “exchange” from Adelaide, Australia, the capital of South Australia, Cooper literally traveled halfway across the world to experience a new life for six months.

“I really love to travel,” she said. “I love my hometown, but it is too small for me. You learn so much about a place when you go stay for an extended period of time.”

Being that Colorado State University was one of the 10 institutions Cooper could choose from, she took into account what would work best with her degree.  As a journalism major, the upheld reputation of the Journalism and Technical Communication Department at CSU stood out to her.

“Ft. Collins looked so pretty and there was so much to do and see, and it seemed easy to get around,” Cooper said, with a glint of excitement in her eyes. “I live right by the beach back home so it was nice to come to a place so close to the mountains.”

Staying in Ft. Collins for only a semester, she hopes to take advantage of her travel time in the United States.  With Washington D.C. on her radar, she notes that her interest in U.S. politics was one of the determining factors that swayed her over studying abroad in Europe.

Outlining her travel itinerary, Cooper plans to go to San Francisco, Cali., over spring break for an Indie music festival.  Her parents are coming to visit after the semester ends to travel together to New York and Chicago before she continues her solo journey up the East Coast into Canada.

Currently Cooper lives in a house with Americans as well as other exchange students.  She enjoys being able to observe the American perspective, especially when it comes to politics.

Bearing this in mind, one apparent difference between the two countries comes to mind: the “right” and “wrong” side of the road.  However, she highlights one drastic difference in particular: the weather.

Upon leaving Australia in 120-degree heat, Cooper, wearing her heavy winter coat, lugged her lone survival backpacker’s bag full of winter clothes onto the plane.

“I’m not used to the constant cold,” Cooper said. “I saw snow fall for the first time [here].  It was such a pretty, white powder.  I ran to tell my roommates and was like, ‘Guys, it’s snowing!’ They were like ‘we know’, like it was completely normal. As soon as it’s slightly warm, everyone’s wearing t-shirts and flip flops and I’m still all bundled up. I guess you have to make the most of a warm day here.”

Another slight difference Cooper has stumbled upon is that of the food and bar scene.  Though corporations like McDonalds and KFC have become ubiquitous globally, permeating into countries including Australia, there are slight differences in food choices and availability.  She notes that there’s “heaps” of international cuisine in Fort Collins.  In particular, there is more Mexican food here, not that she has any complaints with her newfound love of burritos.

“I do miss Vegemite,” Cooper said, vouching for the staple of any Aussie diet. “I’m waiting for my care package to come because it has Vegemite in it.  It’s definitely an acquired taste.”

In regards to the bar scene in Ft. Collins, Cooper gave her two cents.  The Trailhead Tavern in Old Town was the first bar she visited, and she immediately noticed all the TVs, pool tables and beer, calling it “so American.”

“The bars here are more quirky, a bit older, in a good way,” Cooper said. “They have character.  Our bars are very modern with strobe lights. The bars close early here.  Back home they stay open till 5 a.m., sometimes even 10 a.m.”

Stemming off of this difference, drink specials are pretty much non-existent in Australia.  In fact, the Australian government is considering doing-away with “happy hour” due to the increasingly high levels of intoxication.  There is more control in Australia, Cooper commented.

“[Almost] no one in Australia has guns.  It is really difficult to get a permit.  I felt naughty because I held a gun for the first time here,” she said, hiding a smile.

In terms of her experience interacting with Americans, Cooper rates it as being a positive one, commenting on the friendliness and helpful nature of CSU students in particular.

While abroad and despite all the new and exciting things Cooper doesn’t “normally get to do,” she does keep in contact with friends and family halfway across the globe via Facebook and Skype.  Mentioning that the only time she felt homesick was when she had the flu, she makes the point that “six months goes so quickly” and to take advantage of the time she has here.

“[So far], I’ve only seen Ft. Collins and Denver.  I love Old Town though,” Cooper said, as her mind drifted back to a pivotal point in her time abroad. “A couple of days after I had just arrived, I was tired and jet-lagged.  I had just got a bike so I road down to Old Town with other exchange students.  The lights came on and it was awesome.  It was the first time I knew I had done the right thing by coming here.”

What’s Love Got to Do With It?

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Feb 032013
 

Author: Anna Palmer

Friends, Stephanie Lesar and Lauren Clark, show that love comes in all various forms.  Photo by Anna Palmer.

Friends, Stephanie Lesar and Lauren Clark, show that love comes in all various forms. Photo by Anna Palmer.

“Happiness can only come from inside of you and is the result of your love.  When you are aware that no one else can make you happy, and that happiness is the result of your love, this becomes the greatest mastery: the Mastery of Love,” wrote don Miguel Ruiz, spiritual teacher and world-renowned author.

Born into a family of healers, Ruiz’s parents instilled into him the teachings of the ancient esoteric knowledge of the Toltec people who lived thousands of years ago in southern Mexico.  For centuries, the Toltecs preserved their spiritual knowledge in an attempt to safe-keep this wisdom from those who could intentional misuse it.

As the world has moved forward into an age of change and new beginnings, this knowledge has seeped forth from spiritual teachers such as Ruiz, who now openly shares this authentic way of living that is embodied by inner happiness and love.

In this day and age, it seems that just about everyone is searching for love.  From dating and love advice in books and on the internet, to those who have made it their career helping others find and maintain love, it seems that such superfluous amounts of advice would guarantee love for just about anyone and everyone.  With online dating sites at the tips of people’s fingertips, love appears to be right around the corner for all who seek it out.

Despite the thousands of books and talk shows dedicated to solving this mystery of love, the only real way to know love is to practice it.

“Love in action can only produce happiness.  Fear in action can only produce suffering,” Ruiz wrote.

Giving his input on what makes a relationship last, Curt Schwader, senior English major, said, “There is no such thing as a successful relationship without communication.”

From this perspective, communication may just be one of the keys to opening the doors to finding and maintaining a relationship, romantic or not.

Other words of advice revolve around the concept of timing and simply letting things flow.  Anthony Radney, senior graphic designs major said, “Don’t try so hard.  You’ll find a relationship when it is meant to be.”

Stemming off of this, it appears that a romantic relationship finds you when you’re least expecting it and the trick is to not go looking for that special relationship, added Brianne Thayer, senior English major.

Yet, it seems that all too often people are searching outside of themselves to find that love, to validate their own worth.

“If you open your heart, you already have all the love you need.  There’s no need to go around the world begging for love.  We have love right here inside us, but we don’t see this love,” Ruiz wrote.

Ruiz advises all to accept and love themselves first and foremost, before accepting and loving someone else. Lauren Clark, senior journalism and technical communications major, maintains the view that above all, being a solid independent person who doesn’t have to rely on others for happiness is key.

“You need to be okay being alone before you can be with someone else.  If you can’t be alone with yourself, how can you expect anyone to want to be with you?” Clark said.

Others take the broader viewpoint of love not being limited to the scope of romance.  “People think of love in only one way.  Why can’t you love things like nature or life itself?” said Stephanie Lesar, senior anthropology and sociology major.

Whether it is love between two partners, two friends, or outside these person-to-person confines, love in its pure form is in essence the same love, according to Ruiz.  All love stems from the same source, the love that is inside each and every person just waiting to be accessed.

“There are millions of ways to express your happiness, but there is only one way to really be happy, and that is love,” Ruiz wrote. “There is no other way.  You cannot be happy if you don’t love yourself.”

What’s Love Got to Do With It?

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Feb 032013
 

Author: Anna Palmer

Friends, Stephanie Lesar and Lauren Clark, show that love comes in all various forms.  Photo by Anna Palmer.

Friends, Stephanie Lesar and Lauren Clark, show that love comes in all various forms. Photo by Anna Palmer.

“Happiness can only come from inside of you and is the result of your love.  When you are aware that no one else can make you happy, and that happiness is the result of your love, this becomes the greatest mastery: the Mastery of Love,” wrote don Miguel Ruiz, spiritual teacher and world-renowned author.

Born into a family of healers, Ruiz’s parents instilled into him the teachings of the ancient esoteric knowledge of the Toltec people who lived thousands of years ago in southern Mexico.  For centuries, the Toltecs preserved their spiritual knowledge in an attempt to safe-keep this wisdom from those who could intentional misuse it.

As the world has moved forward into an age of change and new beginnings, this knowledge has seeped forth from spiritual teachers such as Ruiz, who now openly shares this authentic way of living that is embodied by inner happiness and love.

In this day and age, it seems that just about everyone is searching for love.  From dating and love advice in books and on the internet, to those who have made it their career helping others find and maintain love, it seems that such superfluous amounts of advice would guarantee love for just about anyone and everyone.  With online dating sites at the tips of people’s fingertips, love appears to be right around the corner for all who seek it out.

Despite the thousands of books and talk shows dedicated to solving this mystery of love, the only real way to know love is to practice it.

“Love in action can only produce happiness.  Fear in action can only produce suffering,” Ruiz wrote.

Giving his input on what makes a relationship last, Curt Schwader, senior English major, said, “There is no such thing as a successful relationship without communication.”

From this perspective, communication may just be one of the keys to opening the doors to finding and maintaining a relationship, romantic or not.

Other words of advice revolve around the concept of timing and simply letting things flow.  Anthony Radney, senior graphic designs major said, “Don’t try so hard.  You’ll find a relationship when it is meant to be.”

Stemming off of this, it appears that a romantic relationship finds you when you’re least expecting it and the trick is to not go looking for that special relationship, added Brianne Thayer, senior English major.

Yet, it seems that all too often people are searching outside of themselves to find that love, to validate their own worth.

“If you open your heart, you already have all the love you need.  There’s no need to go around the world begging for love.  We have love right here inside us, but we don’t see this love,” Ruiz wrote.

Ruiz advises all to accept and love themselves first and foremost, before accepting and loving someone else. Lauren Clark, senior journalism and technical communications major, maintains the view that above all, being a solid independent person who doesn’t have to rely on others for happiness is key.

“You need to be okay being alone before you can be with someone else.  If you can’t be alone with yourself, how can you expect anyone to want to be with you?” Clark said.

Others take the broader viewpoint of love not being limited to the scope of romance.  “People think of love in only one way.  Why can’t you love things like nature or life itself?” said Stephanie Lesar, senior anthropology and sociology major.

Whether it is love between two partners, two friends, or outside these person-to-person confines, love in its pure form is in essence the same love, according to Ruiz.  All love stems from the same source, the love that is inside each and every person just waiting to be accessed.

“There are millions of ways to express your happiness, but there is only one way to really be happy, and that is love,” Ruiz wrote. “There is no other way.  You cannot be happy if you don’t love yourself.”

Killing the mood: Embarrassing sex stories students tell around campus

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Feb 032013
 

Author: Jack Krause

Who says students don’t have embarrassing stories to tell? In fact, there are more out there than one would think. Four students opened up about their sex lives.

“Me and a girl go out to a movie – me and my lady. Things are going really well and we start making out in the car. So we go and drive to a parking lot, turn off the car and hop in the backseat. So, things are really getting hot and heavy. And then…. ‘ouch.’ I ask her what’s wrong. She says ‘I don’t know, I must have sat on something.’ I looked behind her, and its my little sister’s booster seat. It kind of killed the mood.”

-Brett, freshman

” I was out on a date with this girl, and we were getting ice cream. After we get done, she goes ‘I still feel like I could go for some more dessert.’ So I get all excited, and ask where she wants to go. ‘I think we can go back to your house’, she says, so we go back and on the way, all she can talk about is ‘licking on an ice cream cone.’ We get back to my house, and we run in, and I ask where she wants to do this. She says the kitchen. So I go into my bedroom and strip down, come to the kitchen, and she is eating ice cream. Blue like ice.”

-Scott, sophomore

“I was fooling around with this guy and not only did my period start in the middle of it but his mom came home. He went outside and his mom was like, ‘what are you doing?’ And he looks at her with a big grin and says I’m showing her my room. I walked downstairs to meet her and there was glitter from my thong on his face.”

-Kelsey, freshman

“His roommate came home while I was getting dressed. Walked outside his door and my RA and three of my guy friends were waiting for me as soon as I walked out. Oh, also the door was left open while we were in the act.”

-Brittney, junior

Killing the mood: Embarrassing sex stories students tell around campus

 Beats, In The Know, The Well  Comments Off on Killing the mood: Embarrassing sex stories students tell around campus
Feb 032013
 

Author: Jack Krause

Who says students don’t have embarrassing stories to tell? In fact, there are more out there than one would think. Four students opened up about their sex lives.

“Me and a girl go out to a movie – me and my lady. Things are going really well and we start making out in the car. So we go and drive to a parking lot, turn off the car and hop in the backseat. So, things are really getting hot and heavy. And then…. ‘ouch.’ I ask her what’s wrong. She says ‘I don’t know, I must have sat on something.’ I looked behind her, and its my little sister’s booster seat. It kind of killed the mood.”

-Brett, freshman

” I was out on a date with this girl, and we were getting ice cream. After we get done, she goes ‘I still feel like I could go for some more dessert.’ So I get all excited, and ask where she wants to go. ‘I think we can go back to your house’, she says, so we go back and on the way, all she can talk about is ‘licking on an ice cream cone.’ We get back to my house, and we run in, and I ask where she wants to do this. She says the kitchen. So I go into my bedroom and strip down, come to the kitchen, and she is eating ice cream. Blue like ice.”

-Scott, sophomore

“I was fooling around with this guy and not only did my period start in the middle of it but his mom came home. He went outside and his mom was like, ‘what are you doing?’ And he looks at her with a big grin and says I’m showing her my room. I walked downstairs to meet her and there was glitter from my thong on his face.”

-Kelsey, freshman

“His roommate came home while I was getting dressed. Walked outside his door and my RA and three of my guy friends were waiting for me as soon as I walked out. Oh, also the door was left open while we were in the act.”

-Brittney, junior

In The Know: Dani Odelson sews on Precious Pocketz

 In The Know, The Well  Comments Off on In The Know: Dani Odelson sews on Precious Pocketz
Dec 042012
 

Author: Nicole Beale

Dani Odelson uses her creativity to decorate sweatshirts with pockets. Photo by Dani Odelson

Colorado States’ very own Dani Odelson is making a name for herself around campus by designing pockets. Odelson creates custom pockets for just about anything you can think of with just about any fabric you can think of. Instead of freaking out last minute because you have no gifts for anyone this holiday season why don’t you try something different and maybe even a little cheaper. Everyone loves the usual gifts, but something handmade, something made with love is always better. She has pocketed things from boxer briefs to tank tops and everything in between. She says she just “loves pocketing everything.”

What started about a year ago turned into a booming business. Odelson says she started the company, called Precious Pocketz, for herself and now loves making them for other people.

“So many of my friends love wearing them, which also helps spread the word,” Odelson said.

She said recently that she received nine in one today. Soon she might need to hire an assistant.

“I am selling so many on campus – I made enough to pay for a three week vacation to San Fransico last year,” Odelson said.

Dani also has some friends representing her pockets at other Colorado campuses getting her some extra advertisement. While she isn’t trying to make this a career, it certainly is a great way to make some extra spending money.

Some may think with her talent that she would be studying apparel and design, but she is studying communication with a minor in women’s studies.

“I’ve just always loved crafting,” Odelson said.

Odelson was born in Los Angelos but has called Colorado home since she was five years old. She knows Colorado and tries to aim her company towards gear that is popular and suitable for Colorado weather.

It’s a great gift idea simply for the fact you can customize it anyway you want. Some of the most popular styles to pocket are sweatpants, tank tops, sweatshirts and t-shirts.

When asked where she picks up the funky fabric for these pockets Dani says, “Everywhere! Anything ugly and weird I see, I pick it up. The most elaborate design I have ever done is a sweatshirt pocketed with a wolf fabric – something that is really popular today.”

Dani describes her style as “the weird-o seventh grader that everyone loves.” Prices are within reason, most of the items costing around $20 and the sweatshirts costing a little more at $45 because it includes two pockets, one being significantly larger. This cost includes the clothing and the pockets sewn on.

Here is how Odelson breaks it down. First she purchases the garment due to customer specifications. Then she finds fabric to create a pocket with. For sweatshirts she must take off the pockets and replace them with the new precious pocket. After that, she sews the precious pocket to any clothing item you want. Odelson has recently set up an Etsy account, so she will be selling them online.

“I want them to still be super customizable,” Odelson said.

Etsy allows her to put her company online, but still allow for that customization.  To place an order with Odelson, go to the Precious PocketZ Facebook page or check her out on Etsy under the Precious Pocketz company name. Then anxiously wait for your customized pocket to arrive.