Jan 312012
 
Authors: Allison Sylte

During last week’s budget retreat, CSU President Tony Frank and Provost and Executive Vice President Rick Miranda outlined the latest draft of the 2012/13 fiscal year budget.

The Collegian caught up with Frank and Miranda after the meeting to get more details about what’s in the pipeline for next year.

How much are we expecting to see tuition increase next year?

Miranda: Right now we’re modeling 9 percent. The greatest increase we requested from the CCHE (Colorado Commission on Higher Education) is 12 percent, but we don’t think we’ll need to do that.

Frank: Out-of-state students will see somewhere in the 3 percent range, and graduate students will be somewhere in the 6 percent range. The tuition increase between in-state and out-of-state students is about the same monetary amount.

In Dr. Frank’s presentation, he detailed how, because of budget cuts, we have fewer staff who are, in essence, working harder. How do you think this effects the quality of education at CSU compared to a few years ago, before our financial difficulties hit?

Miranda: I wouldn’t say that it has significantly eroded. I just think that it’s forced all of us to work a little bit smarter. We’ve also been relying on technology a bit more, and different online resources.

It’s also meant that we’ve seen a lot more student tutors — quite a few of which are undergraduates.

Frank: And we’ve also implemented new registration options that just have made it more efficient for students to waitlist classes. The bottomline, really, is that the education hasn’t been diluted at all.

You’ve talked a lot about increasing the number of out-of-state students to increase revenue. Do you have any goals in mind?

Frank: Well, a lot of the $4.5 million surplus came from an influx in out-of-state students and transfer that we didn’t expect, so especially in these troubling financial times for the state, they’re definitely a revenue generator for us.

Miranda: As for goals, we’ve had our amount of out-of-state enrollment decrease in recent years, because of the economy, so we’d like to see it get back up to the 18-20 percent range where it was a few years ago. That’s kind of our immediate goal.

Frank: But, obviously, as a land grant institution, we have an inherent obligation to Colorado students, something that I think our Commitment to Colorado has done a great job fulfilling.

As compared to last year’s budget retreat, when each department was asked to cut up to 15 percent off of their budget, I can’t help but notice that this year everyone’s a little less panicked. Is that a true statement?

Frank: Yes, I would definitely agree with that. The projections coming from the state level are looking a lot better than last year. Most of us think that this is the last year we’re going to be looking at a negative budget. Things are definitely looking a little better, and I think that represents a little bit of the mood in the country.

Miranda: I wouldn’t say that we’re grateful to have gotten to where we are as an institution, especially after the hurdles we’ve had to deal with in recent years. I’m especially impressed with the students’ willingness to accept the tuition increases they have to deal with — to kind of see the necessity.

During last week’s budget retreat, CSU President Tony Frank and Provost and Executive Vice President Rick Miranda outlined the latest draft of the 2012/13 fiscal year budget.

The Collegian caught up with Frank and Miranda after the meeting to get more details about what’s in the pipeline for next year.

 Posted by at 3:51 pm