Community Briefs 10/10/11

 Uncategorized
Oct 092011
 
Authors: Collegian Staff Report

CSU swimming and diving get two wins in Grand Junction

CSU competed in the Intermountain Shootout Invitational in Grand Junction over the weekend at the El Pomar Natatorium.

The Rams competed against Utah, Mesa State and Northern Colorado, earning victories against UNC and Mesa State, but fell to Utah.

“We had good, solid swims,” CSU coach Woody Woodard said. “But we have a long way to go.”

The first meet of the year provides hope for a strong season for the first-year coach. Senior Fran Mathias was the Rams’ standout in the 200-meter butterfly.

The team’s first home meet is Oct. 22 at 1 p.m. against the University of Denver.

CSU ranks near top in solar power for public universities

CSU placed in the top four for solar power among major public research universities according to the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE).

CSU hosts about 5,500 kilowatts of power on campus, mostly concentrated at the Foothills Campus on the west side of town. The plant produces about 8.5 million-kilowatt hours of electrical energy, enough to power 1,000 homes for one year.

The plant also reduces the amount of greenhouse gases emitted into the atmosphere by more than 6 million kilograms. CSU was the first public research university in Colorado to install a major solar facility.

Professor to study climate change in Colorado River basin

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation awarded CSU biology professor LeRoy Poff $105,000 for a two-year research project on the effects of climate change on stream hydrology.

Poff plans to focus on the Colorado River basin to identify streams with dry spells in the summer forcing the surrounding environment to adapt. The ultimate goal of the research is to understand vegetation sensitivity to climate change and the ability of the vegetation to change for the development of maps for policymakers and conservation groups.

Poff and other scientists in the group also work with U.S. Geological Survey and The Nature Conservancy on climate change research.

 Posted by at 3:10 pm

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.