To the Editor:

 Uncategorized
May 042006
 
Authors:

Your opinion regarding the sentence received by Moussaoui was ridiculous. You claim that the sentence of life in prison is worse than death, openly admitting that the conditions of confinement are such as to cause severe psychological trauma. Yet, you later claim the sentence shows mercy. Yes, how merciful we humanitarian liberals of the 20th century are.

What was also ridiculous was your criteria for determining what constituted the “right” decision. What seems to matter to you is not some standard of right or wrong, or any notion of justice, but instead what the Arab world thinks of the United States and what Moussaoui seemingly wanted (to you anyway), as if these have any bearing on justice.

Justice would have been a swift two-day trial (not four years), followed the next day by a public execution by hanging on the Washington mall. It is interesting that your weak stomach for capital punishment and your weak sense of justice does not make you humanitarians at all, and instead your natural outrage for such criminals manifests itself in a perverse taste for psychological suffering.

Sincerely,

James Easton

2nd bachelor’s, civil engineering

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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To the Editor:

 Uncategorized  Add comments
May 042006
 
Authors:

Thank goodness Zacarias Moussaoui did not get the death penalty! And congrats to the Collegian for agreeing with this, as he would have wanted to take the easy way out and die rather than spending his days in jail and truly suffering for what he has done. The real problem, though, lies with the idea of the death penalty.

The main argument for the penalty is that it is supposedly a deterrent for those who may commit crimes in the future. Well, this may have been true when they used to hang people in public, but I believe we have advanced since the 19th century.

To quote a very good friend of mine, “There are three types of people who commit crimes worthy of the death penalty: the mentally insane (who we don’t kill anyway), those who believe they will get away with the crime and those who don’t care if they live or die (such as terrorists).”

This punishment is not a deterrent for any of these people, and the government is wasting so much money putting people to death (mainly because of the appeals process and the legal system) that it ends up costing more to put someone to death than imprison him for life.

Lastly, I know that, if I were given the option, I would choose to die rather than spend my life in jail. It is a much more severe punishment to have someone stuck in a room with only limited action and sunlight for the rest of his life than to put him away for a relatively short period of time and kill him. We must progress and eliminate the death penalty in this country.

Chris Turnbull-Grimes

senior

civil engineering

 Posted by at 5:00 pm