Apr 172006
 
Authors: Collegian Editorial Staff

As journalists, the Collegian editorial board gets its fair share of CNN, Fox News, The New York Times, etc. Our lives are saturated in current events and political commentary on a daily basis.

And after reading Tyler Whittman’s column today, we realized something – Comedy Central’s “South Park” has the most poignant and most challenging political commentary on the airwaves today.

Yes, we said it and we know we are going to get grief for it. But the fact remains, there is nobody out there challenging and questioning society better than Stan, Kyle, Eric, Kenny and Butters.

Under the veil of fart jokes and outrageousness, Stone and Parker point out the follies of our society in the simplest of terms.

The show has addressed issues that affect all parts of society. From illegal steroids to religion, sexual predators and hybrid cars, the “South Park” creators leave no hot-button issue un-pushed.

Yet the show isn’t only about shock value and fart jokes. Most episodes end with a comment about current society that is so sharp you didn’t even see it coming.

In a day where free speech is constantly challenged and questioned, Stone and Parker may be the Thomas Paine(s) of our generation.

It should come as no surprise that Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show” also makes our short list of programs that we appreciate for challenging the status quo.

Like “South Park,” “The Daily Show” is an equal opportunity commentator.

Best known for their coverage of the 2004 presidential election, Jon Stewart and the gang gave it to our political system. They left no inadequacy unseen on both sides of the political battlefield.

Most importantly, however, their coverage, while hilarious, was poignant and factual.

We commend Comedy Central for teaching us that news and current events don’t always need to be boring, and we applaud Stone and Parker for posing the ever-poignant ethical question “What would Brian Boitano do?”

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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