To the Editor:

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Oct 262005
 
Authors:

I agree there is such a thing as "too skinny" and your numbers on eating disorders speak for themselves. However, obesity IS a problem. In fact it's listed as a disease by the Center for Disease Control. Childhood obesity is on the rise. Over 15 percent of children have a Body Mass Index (BMI) over 30, which is the mark for adult obesity (a BMI over 25 is considered overweight). Compare this to 11 percent in 1994 and 7 percent in 1980. The American Obesity Association states these children are quite likely to have obesity persist into adulthood. Add to those numbers that 34 percent of Americans are already considered obese and you have what is known as an epidemic.

Physically fit people are 53 percent less likely to die premature deaths than the unfit, four times less likely to die from cancer and eight times less likely to die from cardiovascular disease. Eighty percent of people with Type 2 diabetes are overweight. Overweight people are 20 percent more likely to have asthma, 120 percent more likely to get stomach cancer, 90 percent more likely to get gallstones, 590 percent more likely to develop esophageal cancer and 50 percent more likely to have erectile dysfunction. I'd say that's a big problem.

Kerry Hosken

Alumnus

Zoology

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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To the Editor:

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Oct 262005
 
Authors:

The article entitled "Local rape reports highest in state" printed Oct. 20 contained important statistics about rape and sexual assault. However, it failed to mention some very important pieces of information.

I am completing Victim Assistance Team (VAT) training this semester, offered through the Office of Women's Programs and Studies. We learn that nationwide, 1 in 4 college-age women will be victims or survivors of sexual assault. That statistic is alarming and important when we consider Fort Collins is a college town, thus increasing the proclivity of the city's high number of rape reports. Other similarly-sized cities across the state and nation may not house 25,000 students, so their incidences of rape may be lower. However, for cities with a high percentage of young adults, it is not always a good thing to have a low rape reporting number. Chances are in those communities, rapes are occurring as frequently as they are in Fort Collins, they are just not being reported for a variety of reasons.

Unfortunately, because Fort Collins is a college town with such a high percentage (25 percent) of the population attending CSU, we do have a higher number of rapes and sexual assaults. However, we as a community should be pleased we have such a high number of reported rapes. This means services such as Fort Collins Sexual Assault Victim Advocates, VAT, and the Fort Collins and CSU Police Departments are doing a great job of providing supportive services for victims/survivors of sexual assault. By providing such comprehensive services through the work of hundreds of committed volunteer advocates, the city of Fort Collins is taking proactive steps toward reducing and eliminating this awful crime. Other college towns may have lower reports of rape, but chances are those rapists are not being prosecuted and the victims may not be receiving the support they need.

Haley Richards

Academic Advisor

Center for Advising and Student Achievement

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the Editor:

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Oct 262005
 
Authors:

In her Oct. 25 column, Megan Schulz references the tragic murder of three children in San Francisco as an example of a problem that has plagued our country. The problem, according to Schulz, is "…children are born into families who can't support them."

While reading the first four paragraphs, I was cautiously optimistic that I would actually end up agreeing with the author. Unfortunately, those hopes were shattered as Schulz disappointingly admits, "As much as I hate the idea of using abortion as birth control, in some cases it is the best option."

Oh really? What cases would those be and how would you determine that? Further, even if it was possible to predict how the lives of the unborn would turn out, who are we to determine death would be better? While I absolutely detest the inept, abusive and grossly derelict parents in this society, I do not believe abortion will solve the problem.

Instead, the culture must transform into a state where human life, at all levels, is considered sacrosanct, and selfish desires take a back seat to the greater good.

Schulz goes on to ask this rhetorical question: "For all you conservatives who are for tax cuts but oppose abortion…Do you like the idea of your taxes going to support welfare to pay for the lives of these children who are probably starving anyway?" Um…what? We support tax cuts but like the idea of our taxes going to support welfare? That makes no sense! We want tax cuts because we don't want the government to have it. Come on now, Megan!

Tommy Herrera

Junior

Journalism and Philosophy

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the Editor:

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Oct 262005
 
Authors:

In response to Ryan Chapman's recent article "How is the war on terrorism really going?" he boasted about the successful war and how three-quarters of al-Qaeda's leaders and associates have been killed or captured – which in a sense, is good. But does he not realize that thousands of their followers are still running around planting roadside bombs and pulling off successful suicide bombings that kill more than just themselves?

These people have now become the leaders of their terrorist organizations, and in addition to killing their own people, they have moved on to attacking Britain, Spain and Indonesia in order to prove they can still cause destruction in the world.

Ryan stated our country fought terrorists the Democrat's way for eight years and "all we succeeded in doing was getting thousands of innocent Americans killed." So how is it going your way, Ryan? As of the same day your article ran, 2,000 American troops had been killed in the war and that doesn't count the thousands of civilian Iraqi men, women and children who have also been killed. Regardless of whether they are American, Iraqi or any other nationality – are they not innocent as well? Although the people voted on writing a constitution, I don't believe the killing will end any time soon.

So I guess in my opinion, your way of fighting the war doesn't seem any better than ours does.

Jamie Everman

Freshman

Microbiology

 Posted by at 5:00 pm