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Feb 152005
 
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Um, wow. JP Eichmiller stated in his column last week that he believes that "naked breasts and gangster rap are more reflective of our culture than Paul McCartney will ever be?!"

I understand that Janet Jackson and Justin Timberlake may have a youthful, energetic, teenage following, but Paul has staying power! The minute the Beatles hit our soil the culture began to change. Everything from hairstyles to bell-bottoms to electric guitar to love-song lyrics were influenced by the Fab Four and as their songs became darker and more complex, so did American culture and the styles associated with it (think the hippie movement).

While it seems like it's boobs over Beatles, think again. Breasts define our culture? If we were a culture more accepting of sexuality, like Europe, her boob would have never even made headlines!

Monique Pawlowski

Senior, creative writing major

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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To the editor:

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Feb 152005
 
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I am a student at University of Colorado and currently we are in a competition called Recycle Mania. This competition is against 50 other universities in the nation to see who will recycle the most from January to April. This is huge. Not just for the trophy, but also for the simple concept of understanding which universities are aware of the need to recycle.

The United States makes up about 5 percent of the world population yet utilizes 35 percent of the resources. From the beginning of civilization wars have been fought over resources and that continues to be the cause of wars today. We will not sustain our presence as a species here on Earth if we don't make the move toward renewable resources.

This is not some tree-huggin' hippy wanting us to save the Earth. The Earth has sustained many catastrophes in the past; I want to save our species. We are using up the resources critical to the healthy environment that we are adapted to live in; we poison our waters, our lands and decrease available healthy natural food sources.

It's time to step up and take responsibility for our actions: We're here, we're intelligent and we're capable of creating a sustainable environment in our societies. Please help CU to get the word out; Recycle Mania is here … Recycle Damn It!!

Sincerely,

Jesi Vandeputte

Ecology & Evolutionary Biology BS/MA candidate

University of Colorado

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the editor:

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Feb 152005
 
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Tyler Wittman's Tuesday column "ETA effective? Let's hope not" illustrates one of the most preeminent problems facing U.S. citizens in today's post-Sept. 11, 2001, world.

The war on terrorism is, as Orwell might have described it, no more than "double think." The United States has been the predominant state sponsor of terrorism or counterterrorism for the majority of the 21st century. To define a "war on terrorism," perhaps one should research the first time that a "war on terrorism" was declared in 1984 during the Reagan administration.

During this period, this "war on terrorism" was used to justify both the support and aid via the CIA of various cruel totalitarian regimes and their dirty wars as well as the purported bombing of a mosque in Lebanon, killing 200 or so people. Given this context, perhaps the "war on terrorism" is nothing more than a green light for countries to continue their own brands of state-sponsored terrorism in places such as Chechnya, Kurdistan, the West bank and the Gaza strip, to mention a few.

The acceptance that we were attacked by terrorists on Sept. 11, 2001, is rather easily obtained by most people, yet the possibility that the United States is in any form also a sponsor of terrorism seems to be a stretch.

Is it really that far of a stretch though? After all, it was our country's CIA that trained Osama bin Laden in the '80s in terrorist techniques in order to drive the U.S.S.R. out of Afghanistan and give them "their Vietnam." Given this background information, the idea that only "Iran and Syria should mend their terrorist-supporting ways" is a bit like the pot calling the kettle black.

Patrick Hume

Senior biochemistry major

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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Feb 152005
 
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This is in response to Tyler Wittman's article "Euskadi ta Askatasuna effective? Let's hope not," in Tuesday's Collegian.

This article does a very good job of portraying the Basque people in the wrong way. Having spent a month in the Basque Country and having lived with a Basque for a year, I realized what a great and proud culture they have. This article does not represent the majority of Basque people.

Yes, the majority of Basque people do not consider themselves Spaniards and yes, they desire independence from Spain, but at the same time the majority do not support the actions of ETA. ETA as a whole is a very small group today with an estimated active group of about 20 to 30 members.

This article gave misleading information on the Basque Country and Basque people in general. This is because Wittman did not show the differences between ETA and the majority of Basque people who do not support the means ETA uses in finding a way to its ultimate goal of independence from Spain.

Eric Grindstaff

Sophomore

Natural Resources Management

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the editor:

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Feb 152005
 
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Gov. Bill Owens and many other prominent people have called for the resignation of University of Colorado-Boulder professor Ward Churchill on the basis that his tenure does not protect his position because he has used faulty and inadequate research and arrived at unsupported conclusions.

Most tenured professors believe that their opinions are entitled to greater protection than even the First Amendment provides – not less protection.

The Churchill controversy may be compared to this scenario: Attorneys for both sides of an appeal submit lengthy briefs in support of the rights of their clients. The losing attorney is not disbarred. In fact, his positions may be the basis of dissenting opinions and may become the law in future cases.

Why not encourage those who criticize Churchill to publish letters, essays and books, and make speeches in opposition, and let public opinion decide? Isn't this the real American way, and in support of the Constitution?

 

Joe Stern

Community member

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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Feb 152005
 
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I was very happy to see the article written by Hallie Woods titled "Wheat Disease on the Rise" in Wednesday's Collegian. Celiac disease is indeed an increasingly common and often misdiagnosed disorder. Wild Oats Natural Marketplace, as mentioned in the article, is a great place to meet the needs of people with dietary restrictions, as well as provide valuable information to customers.

Wild Oats Markets recently produced a publication called "Gluten-Free Living: A Guide to Living Well Without Gluten" that is available free of charge and can be found in our natural living department, as well as near our recipe center (look for gluten-free recipes as well!).

Stop by our store at 200 W. Foothills Parkway (across from the Foothills Mall) to pick one up and feel free to ask for help from any Wild Oats employee. Our Fort Collins Wild Oats store also offers a 10 percent discount to CSU students and staff.

Anne Carey

Community Marketing Coordinator

Wild Oats Natural Marketplace, Fort Collins

 Posted by at 5:00 pm