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Jan 202005
 
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As I opened the first paper of the new semester on Tuesday and read Jessica Anderson's column entitled "Cutting off old ties through new hairstyles," I was appalled. I cannot believe that the Collegian allowed this journal entry article to be printed. It had absolutely nothing to do with our CSU or Fort Collins community. I expected Ms. Anderson's column to bear some intelligence since, after all, she is a junior technical journalism major. I am curious as to why Ms. Anderson and the Collegian staff thought that this fluff was actually appropriate to place in an academic newspaper. It belongs in Ms. Anderson's journal. Ms. Anderson could have discussed "Locks of Love," a nonprofit organization that provides hairpieces for financially disadvantaged children 18 years and younger, suffering from long-term, medical hair loss. This wonderful organization requires a minimum of 10 inches of hair to be eligible for donation. Since Ms. Anderson was so tempted to write about her "awesome new hairstyle," she should have included this information to spread the word about hair donation. By informing students of this charity, it would have at least made her drivel worth reading.

Kristin Miller

Sophomore consumer and family studies education major

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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To the editor:

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Jan 202005
 
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Thursday I was so proud to see my fellow Fort Collins citizens on the corner of Mulberry Street and College Avenue protesting the presidency of George W. Bush. To those of you who stood on that corner (or any other), thank you. It warms my heart to know that even if Colorado is technically a "red state," there are still plenty of us here who know the difference between right and wrong and are not afraid to stand up for it.

Jennifer Tippett

Junior psychology major

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the editor:

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Jan 202005
 
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Vincent Adams truly outdid himself this time. His column "$4 won't buy you freedom" was by far the most offensive column of his I have read thus far. Firstly, his assumption that everyone displaying a "Support Our Troops" sticker is a "flag-waving nimrod" is callous, shallow and unbelievably disrespectful to those in uniform. Stating that these soldiers have "lost their lives in vain" simply because he disagrees with why they are there is an insult to them and their families and shows the true nature of Vince's character.

These stickers say nothing at all about supporting the war in Iraq; they are about showing that your thoughts and prayers are with those serving our country throughout the world. Vincent doesn't realize that, which amazes me.

As for his notion that we support the Iraqi war no matter what, he couldn't be further off the mark. Contrary to the beliefs of Vince and other far leftists, most of us on the right aren't trying to cover up anything and fully acknowledge the shortcomings and mistakes made in Iraq. Mistakes are made in every war. We also acknowledge that removing from power a dictator who committed genocide on his own people is a noble cause and those who lost their lives doing so are heroes. The heroes whose lives were lost were certainly not lost in vain.

Eric Rogan

Sophomore political science

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the editor:

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Jan 202005
 
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Marriage may have originated as an entity of the church, but it's clearly deeply a part of the state now. Marriage grants more than 1,000 rights not included under civil unions. People should have the right to marry the person they're in love with, without the state denying that right.

America is a great country, due in large part to the huge numbers of freedoms granted to us by the government. Shouldn't that include politicians not forcing us to obey their own religious beliefs by pushing them into law? As Americans, President Bush and U.S. Rep. Marilyn Musgrave have the right to religious freedom. They are free to share with us their beliefs during campaigning and donate their salaries to social organizations fighting for what they believe is right. However, they should not be making laws that restrict how two consenting adults run their private lives.

If the majority of our political leaders happened to be racist and believe interracial marriages aren't real marriages, would it be right for them to push that belief of theirs into law, forcing their morals onto the rest of us?

And what about divorce? If the majority of our politicians were strict Christians and believed divorce was wrong, should they make divorce illegal? Or should they simply strive to avoid it themselves?

Doesn't the 1st Amendment grant religious freedom? So even if some people believe marriage is an entity of the church, the government would still have no authority to deny anyone the right to marry whom they want.

Robert Steele

Senior

Accounting and political science major

 Posted by at 5:00 pm