To the editor:

 Uncategorized
Nov 292004
 
Authors:

 

In reference to Matt Hitt's article on Monday about Christmas shopping, I urge him to explore the facts about Buy Nothing Day, the Friday after Thanksgiving. He dismisses "various anti-consumerism groups" (actually Buy Nothing Day is celebrated by millions of people in several countries) and argues that refusing to participate in the holiday consumerism madness is pointless because of the size and power of the economy. "We can't 'buy nothing' or stop spending money altogether," he writes. I just have to ask, Why not? Why not take a single day out of the year to realize how much our lives revolve around buying things that don't bring us any fulfillment? In an article criticizing holiday over-consumption, Hitt criticizes anti-consumerism groups for not having realistic goals. But my goal on Buy Nothing Day is not to bring the U.S. monster economy to its knees. I don't expect that to happen, nor do I want it to. My goal is simply to take a day that has become a personal holiday, spend it with my loved ones focusing on the things that bring true happiness in this world, and remembering in this "affluenza" season I don't have to participate in trampling my fellow human beings or this earth we share. I believe this is a very realistic and worthwhile goal, and I urge everyone participating in this economy to take a day off.

 

Jenessa M. Strickland

Senior, Philosophy

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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To the editor:

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Nov 292004
 
Authors:

Imagine waking up in a hospital and not knowing why you are there until you remember taking the emergency contraception pill that you received over-the-counter the day before. You have chronic diabetes and did not know of the risks of taking the morning-after pill.

I think as an adult or teenager you would want to be informed of the side effects and precautions you should be taking if you were to receive the emergency contraception and go to a doctor to be prescribed the pill.

The emergency contraception pill is a hormone that a woman can take to reduce her risk of pregnancy after sexual intercourse. She may take the pill up to 120 hours (5 days) after intercourse. The debate is ongoing and I am opposing the emergency contraception being over-the-counter. A woman can just as easily wait to go see the doctor after the weekend to receive the pill. The Food and Drug Administration shut down the proposal of the emergency contraception pill (Plan B) being sold over-the-counter to the public because the pill does not provide adequate data to support a conclusion that Plan B can be used safely by young adolescent women for emergency contraception without consent from a practitioner. It is important to be aware of your options if an accident occurs by promoting the EC pill through doctor's prescription. Plan B is called the "emergency contraception pill" because it is used in an "emergency," not in failure of taking precautions and being irresponsible. If a woman knew she couldn't buy the EC pill over-the-counter, maybe she would think twice of having sexual intercourse. I'm not saying that the EC pill should be taken out of the public's reach, just off of the shelf. Do you want to have the hormone be on shelves for young girls and their friends to run down to their local grocery store and grab?

Meggie Cowan

Senior

Human development and family studies major

 Posted by at 5:00 pm