To the editor:

 Uncategorized
Nov 022004
 
Authors:

As the chant goes, “I am proud to be a CSU fan, I am proud to be

a CSU Ram!”

I am sophomore transfer student in my first semester at CSU, and

yes, I am proud to be a CSU Ram. One of the most enjoyable aspects

of being a CSU student is participating in the support of Rams

athletics. I have attended numerous football games this season, and

as everyone knows, most of the fun happens before the game, in the

parking lot. I think it’s awesome that everyone comes out early to

show his or her green and gold in an all-out party.

What’s not awesome is the disgusting mess that everyone leaves

behind. Recently, I invited friends and family from out of state to

attend a game and we had a great time. They were all very impressed

with the huge party that preceded the game, and we had a great

time. After the game their mood about the party took a sharp

U-turn. The parking lot looked like a giant garbage dump, and let

me tell you, it did not make me proud to be a CSU Ram. Take

responsibility, and clean up after yourselves! Don’t ruin a great

time by being a slob. Have more respect for yourself and your

school.

Bo Alley

Sophomore, political science major

 Posted by at 6:00 pm

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To the editor:

 Uncategorized  Add comments
Nov 022004
 
Authors:

In response to Monday’s article in the Collegian about adjunct

professors’ painfully low wages and lack of job security, I would

like to call shame on CSU. I thought back to the many classes I

have taken at CSU and realized how many of them had been taught not

by tenured professors, but by hard-working adjunct professors.

I believe the benefit these instructors bring to the university

highly surpasses the lack of compensation and lack of flat-out

respect they receive. Every student at CSU depends on adjunct

professors in many core curriculum classes, such as speech,

composition and math. Many of these instructors, when teaching

freshmen and sophomores, literally shape the very academic careers

that these students will take.

It’s true that money at CSU is very tight these days, and there

are many departments and academic areas that are not receiving the

funding they desperately need (such as our under-funded library).

Nonetheless, I believe this issue needs serious attention, more so

than a $15.2 million stadium upgrade, for example.

Adjunct professors do the same job and are, at times, more

visible and approachable than tenured professors and are expected

to uphold the university’s standard of academic excellence for less

than 50 percent of the salary of an assistant professor, less than

35 percent of the salary of an associate professor and less than 25

percent of the salary of a full professor. Haven’t adjunct

professors earned the right to pay equity, job security and

professional respect?

Memo to CSU: Yes, they have.

Jared Van Buskirk

Senior, business administration and management

 Posted by at 6:00 pm

To the editor:

 Uncategorized  Add comments
Nov 022004
 
Authors:

In response to Monday’s article in the Collegian about adjunct

professors’ painfully low wages and lack of job security, I would

like to call shame on CSU. I thought back to the many classes I

have taken at CSU and realized how many of them had been taught not

by tenured professors, but by hard-working adjunct professors.

I believe the benefit these instructors bring to the university

highly surpasses the lack of compensation and lack of flat-out

respect they receive. Every student at CSU depends on adjunct

professors in many core curriculum classes, such as speech,

composition and math. Many of these instructors, when teaching

freshmen and sophomores, literally shape the very academic careers

that these students will take.

It’s true that money at CSU is very tight these days, and there

are many departments and academic areas that are not receiving the

funding they desperately need (such as our under-funded library).

Nonetheless, I believe this issue needs serious attention, more so

than a $15.2 million stadium upgrade, for example.

Adjunct professors do the same job and are, at times, more

visible and approachable than tenured professors and are expected

to uphold the university’s standard of academic excellence for less

than 50 percent of the salary of an assistant professor, less than

35 percent of the salary of an associate professor and less than 25

percent of the salary of a full professor. Haven’t adjunct

professors earned the right to pay equity, job security and

professional respect?

Memo to CSU: Yes, they have.

Jared Van Buskirk

Senior, business administration and management

 Posted by at 6:00 pm

To the editor:

 Uncategorized  Add comments
Nov 022004
 
Authors:

I have to say I have little to no pity for the adjunct

professors and their problems as brought up in Monday’s Collegian.

Concerns about the lack of job security just made me laugh, as

there are no guaranteed jobs out there, with the exception of

tenured professors who have been immersed in academia their entire

lives. For the other 99.99 percent of the population, concerns

about downsizing, outsourcing, lack of recognition and low pay are

very real daily matters. While I can certainly understand the

concerns about someone earning $24,000 a year, that is still above

the poverty level and commensurate with entry-level pay in many

professions.

Welcome to the real world, adjuncts. Your job isn’t guaranteed

to be your job, and getting laid-off or outsourced is very common.

I’ve been there, and watched friends with 19 years at Hewlett

Packard get “right-sized” as their jobs went away and they were

left without a retirement package. Maybe it’s not fair, but that’s

the way the cookie crumbles. Good luck out there.

Jim Langdon

Senior, sociology

Non-traditional student

 Posted by at 6:00 pm