Oct 312004
 
Authors: Jennifer Johnson

For several years, CSU’s James L. Voss Veterinary Hospital, 300

W. Drake Road, has provided both pets and owners with excellence in

research, medical care, love and hope.

“I see ‘miracles’ performed by our clinicians on almost a daily

basis,” said David Lee, hospital director at the Veterinary

Hospital. “I look at the advancement in our oncology section with

the most awe because many of the cancers we now cure, were cases we

had lack of alternatives for just 10 years ago.”

The Veterinary Teaching Hospital, consists of and specializes in

several different clinical programs including anesthesia,

cardiology, neurology and oncology, while also providing grief

counseling at the Argus Institute and alternative therapies through

the Shipley Center for Natural Healing (are they at the

hospital?).

“The Argus Institute, for example, is a remarkable resource to

the VTH, as it has provided training in client communication and

grief counseling for over 20 years, something that almost every

veterinary college in the U.S. is struggling to incorporate into

its curriculum,” Lee said.

The College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at

CSU is currently ranked No. 2 by U.S. News & World Report and

is one of the most well-known veterinary hospitals both nationally

and internationally.

Lee said the VTH receives the majority of international

recognition from its ability to attract top faculty who continue to

drive the profession through innovation in basic and applied

research, which in turn benefits students.

“Maintaining a cutting-edge research program ensures that

veterinary students at CSU are exposed to the very latest

advancements in the profession,” he said. “Students are an integral

part of the VTH staff and greatly benefit from the experience they

receive.”

Thomas Allen, a third-year vet student and president of the

Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medical Association,

feels the VTH allows future vet students a firsthand idea of what a

career in veterinary medicine will be like.

“Veterinary medicine is a very intense and demanding

profession,” he said. “It is also one of the most rewarding and

fun.”

Allen said the outstanding faculty at the VTH is an important

component in the hospital’s success.

“The dedication (of the faculty) to educate the next generation

of veterinarians is impressive to say the least. Anyone who is

thinking of becoming a veterinarian will benefit immensely from

working at the VTH,” Allen said.

In Allen’s opinion, CSU has the best veterinary hospital in the

country.

“I certainly feel privileged to be a student at this hospital

and believe that the education I am receiving is the best that can

be obtained anywhere,” he said.

Lynda Reed, an administrative assistant at the Animal Cancer

Center believes the best aspects of the VTH are its willingness to

both help and serve the animals.

“We want to make a difference in the animals that we treat,” she

said. “While walking through the hospital, I am always amazed at

the tenderness that the doctors, students and staff show toward the

pets that are hospitalized.”

Reed said people come from all over the world to seek treatment

and hope at the VTH and especially at the Animal Cancer Center.

“Last year we had a client from Romania bring his Rottweiler

here for surgery,” she said. “I think that is incredible.”

Although there are many reasons the VTH is known nationally and

internationally, Reed feels the clients and faculty are the most

important.

“Our clients spread the word about their excellent experiences

at CSU-VTH,” she said. “We also have a wonderful faculty who write

many medical books that students and veterinarians use throughout

the world.”

At the Animal Cancer Center in particular, a lot of research is

done with animal companions, which is something extremely important

to Reed.

“It is so rewarding to see how our research is benefiting so

many others,” she said. “Collaboration is huge in cancer research.

The more teams fighting cancer and collaborating, the easier it is

to fight.”

Reed is one of the many people who are extremely proud of the

VTH and the benefits it provides.

“Everyone that works at the VTH really does make a difference

everyday, even if they are not aware that they do,” she said.

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