Apr 282004
 
Authors: Adrienne Hoenig

Dr. Duane Harshorn may not be alive anymore, but his namesake

celebrated its 40th birthday on Wednesday.

Relatives of Hartshorn gathered with retirees and employees of

Hartshorn Health Service to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the

Duane F. Hartshorn Student Health Center, as it was originally

called.

The building was erected in 1964 as a 44-bed licensed hospital.

It was staffed by 23 full-time employees, and students paid $7.50

in health fees. This was quite a jump from the health service’s

humble beginnings in 1936, when the staff consisted of Hartshorn,

two nurses and a receptionist to serve CSU’s 1,732 students.

Since then, Hartshorn Health Service has grown to serve more

than 20,000 students and faculty in the last year with the help of

75 full-time employees and more than 40 student-employees.

“The model Dr. Hartshorn developed is still the foundation of

the health services,” said Steve Blom, director of Hartshorn Health

Service. “What an accomplished man he was. It’s easy to see why his

name was put on this building.”

Hartshorn died in 1969. His family members and past co-workers

shared stories about his life and his work.

“He was always smiling, always upbeat, he cared about people,”

said Debby Hartshorn Pool, Hartshorn’s daughter. “And he was a fine

physician on the side.”

Hartshorn Health Service has employed many pharmacists, nurses

and physicians in its 40 years. Many of these former employees look

back fondly at their time at Hartshorn Health Service.

“It was delightful,” said Bill Lowe, a pharmacist for Hartshorn

Health Service from 1979 to 1989. “All the young people were so

much fun to be around; they didn’t complain like the older patients

do.”

Since it was opened, Hartshorn Health Service has expanded its

responsibility to include more health education, Blom said.

Sexually transmitted disease prevention, drug and alcohol

awareness, nutrition education and ending tobacco use have become

major focuses of Hartshorn Health Service’s education programs.

“Medicine has changed a lot,” Blom said. “The biggest thing is

our emphasis on wellness and prevention.”

The health service plans to continue to grow and expand in the

future. Efforts to build out the first floor to add new X-ray

rooms, a bigger walk-in pharmacy and urgent-care center are in the

planning stages.

“We need to modernize the facility,” Blom said. “It’s all in the

planning. It’s a dream.”

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