Scientific Research-assessing the risks involved

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Nov 302003
 
Authors: Karthika Muthukumaraswamy

In the 1970s, scientific research involved creative thinking and

an adept pair of hands.

Today, science requires high-performance computing, gene chips,

nanomolecules, biosensors and nuclear magnetic resonance.

Neurotoxins, carcinogens, radioactivity and dozens of hazardous

materials line shelves in research laboratories.

Researchers are exposed to X-rays and other ionizing radiations

on a day-to-day basis.

“There is all kinds of different wastes – high-level wastes

versus very low-level wastes,” said Jim Abraham, a radiation safety

officer at CSU. “(It depends) on the energy and type of particles

released.”

In this era of nuclear race, biowarfare and chemical terrorism,

safety in science is important.

It is being underscored in scientific institutes, universities

and industries.

“With the advent of science, we are going to have

radioactivity,” Abraham said. “Of all the countries I know, the

U.S. has the most strict regulations.”

Abraham said high-level wastes that come out of nuclear reactors

are usually under very high security.

“High-level wastes are kept in very tight containers,” Abraham

said. “(In fact), they mix the liquid wastes with silicate to

solidify and make glass out of it.”

He said the wastes that come out of CSU labs are relatively

low-level wastes. Nonetheless, elaborate security measures need to

be taken.

“I think that CSU is very proactive in protecting its

biowastes,” Abraham said. “We can’t do anything out of the scope of

what the Nuclear Regulatory Commission says.”

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission comes under the branch of the

federal government and inspections are carried out every two

years.

The university has its own radiation safety committee and

reports to the state of Colorado.

“The university has a radiation safety committee that does

unannounced inspections,” Abraham said.

National laboratories that deal with higher-level wastes have

higher security regulations.

Ward Whicker, a professor at the Department of Environmental and

Radiological Health Sciences, is involved in a project for risk

assessment at the Los Alamos National Laboratories in Los Alamos,

NM.

While LANL has its own monitoring station to assess risks, the

New Mexico Environment Department has insisted on an independent

assessment by an outside institute.

“The security there is very high,” Whicker said. “You have to

have special badges to get on the site.”

Whicker is currently on a contract with LANL, in collaboration

with a Risk Assessment Corporation based out of South Carolina.

“One of LANL’s goals is to reduce the risks. Our job is to

provide an objective assessment of the risks and publish it in a

way that will be understood by the public,” Whicker said. “Not only

will we provide risk assessment, but also a method for making

decisions in the future as to how the land will be managed in the

labs.”

The risk assessment project involves analysis of published data

and extensive studies on site.

“There are about 12 people that work for (RAC). They have

different backgrounds, ranging from hydrology to atmospheric

sciences and chemical toxicology,” Whicker said.

The study involves assessment of risk to people who live away

from the labs and the analysis of contamination to air and water

close to the site. Workers in the labs are monitored.

Whicker said communicating the risks involved to the public is

one of the main challenges in this kind of study.

“We are doing a study on the best way for stakeholders to

involve in a study like this,” Whicker said. “What is the best way

to communicate with them? How can we communicate the technical

aspects? These are challenges.”

For large laboratories such as LANL, the containment of wastes

becomes that much harder.

“It is a very complicated study because the lab has a lot of

different facilities. They release hundreds of things to the

environment,” Whicker said. “(Also) there are several different

streams close to LANL. There’s outdoor recreation, like hiking, in

the canyons close by.”

Moreover, the stakes are higher at a place with such high-level

research.

“Los Alamos is certainly a place where they do weapons research.

There is highly classified information. If a terrorist were to blow

up such a site, there would be huge problems,” Whicker said.

High regulations may be painstaking, but graduate students Yeon

Lee and Jes Kuruvilla said they are not too worried about

radiation.

“I feel pretty safe,” said Lee, a student in the Department of

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. “We have a protected area;

outside of that there is no radiation.”

Jes Kuruvilla, another biochemistry graduate student,

agreed.

“Personally, I am not scared of radiation,” Kuruvilla said. “It

is not a big deal. We were shown that rocks from the mountains have

higher radiations (compared to what we deal with).”

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

Volunteering can provide fur fix

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Nov 302003
 
Authors: Lindsay Robinson

Wild animals have always fascinated senior zoology major Lauren

Kloer. So, when she heard about the WildKind program at the Larimer

Humane Society, she jumped at the chance to volunteer.

Now, two years later, Kloer is a paid part-time employee in the

animal behavior department at the humane society, where she trains

animals and works with both wildlife and domestic creatures that

have behavior problems.

Kloer said she loves to show people there are positive ways to

train and work with animals.

“It’s so much fun to be able to work with the owners of the pets

and the animals themselves,” she said. “I find it fun. I love to

train animals.”

The Larimer Humane Society has many volunteer opportunities to

fit all interests. Volunteers can act as kennel assistants, a

position that includes feeding, vaccinations, cage cleaning and

adoption counseling.

Volunteers can also work with the WildKind program, which

involves the rehabilitation of orphaned or injured wild

animals.

“We empower our volunteers to do anything they are interested in

and they can work in any job in our shelter,” said Ellen Taylor,

director of operations at the humane society. “We have volunteers

who never come into the shelter and work on fundraisers, volunteers

who work with wildlife, volunteers who assist in dog-training

classes. We have close to 300 foster homes. Pretty much any job you

want to do, we’ll let you do it as a volunteer.”

In order to become a volunteer, one must first attend a

volunteer information session to learn about the humane society and

the various departments and volunteer opportunities offered. The

next information session will be held Dec. 9 at 6 p.m. at the

Harmony Library, 4616 S. Shields St.

Following the information session, the volunteer is interviewed

by the manager of the department with which he or she is interested

in working. The final step is a training session where the

volunteer learns about the animals he or she will be dealing

with.

Taylor thinks volunteering can be very beneficial for students,

especially those who left pets behind when they came to

college.

“A lot of students are away from home and missing their family

animals. It’s a good opportunity to relieve stress and kind of get

that fur fix that you’re missing out on,” she said.

Ashley Barnes, a junior biology major, volunteers with the

humane society’s WildKind program.

“If you like animals, it’s a good way to spend your time because

it gives you exposure to animals and it gives you a chance to help

animals when they can’t help themselves,” Barnes said. “Seeing

these animals get rehabilitated and get back out there is a very

big reward.”

Both Kloer and Barnes would like to have a career involving

animals and they said their volunteer time at the humane society

has reassured them they have chosen the right job.

“I still want to be a vet, which is one of the main reasons I

started there. It’s made me even more confident that that’s what I

want to do,” Barnes said.

Kloer encourages students to consider volunteering at the humane

society if they are able and advises potential volunteers to make

sure they pick an appropriate department with which to donate their

time.

“I think it’s important for people if they’re interested in

volunteering to really look into the area they’d like to volunteer

in and understand that it’s not all just playing with the animals.

Do your research. Look around, read the volunteer descriptions on

the Web site and find out what you really want to do,” Kloer

said.

To learn how to become a Larimer Humane Society volunteer, visit

the society’s Web site at www.larimerhumane.org for more

information.

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

Grad school instead of job

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Nov 302003
 
Authors: Leigh Pogue

With the unemployment rate steadily rising since 2000 to the

current 6 percent as measured in October, more students are finding

alternatives to getting a job right after graduation.

“I think it is a tightened economy,” said Brian O’Bruba,

associate director of the Career Center and career counselor.

“There are jobs out there, it may take longer to find one

though.”

For some students one alternative to waiting for a job or

getting a job in which they are less interested is to apply to

graduate school and advance their education.

“In general, when jobs are tougher to find, it is a good use of

people’s time to be in school,” said Patrick Pellicane, dean of the

graduate school. “If you find yourself unemployed and with no

prospects immediately, you have to do something with your

time.”

The slowing economy encouraged Dallas Blaney, a master’s student

in political science, to go on to graduate school.

“I always planned on (going to graduate school), but because I

wasn’t able to get a job it made me think about going on in school

sooner,” Blaney said.

Getting a graduate degree may also help Blaney get a job in

teaching, which he was not able to do with just his bachelor’s

degree in history.

Holly Gates-Peters, who is working on her master’s in speech

communication, came back to get her advanced degree after working

for three years in the corporate setting. She decided to go to

graduate school because her job in corporate human resources wasn’t

as rewarding as she had hoped. She was also encouraged to go back

because when she graduates in May 2005 she believes the job market

will be better.

Gates-Peters said of the 12 students in her program, at least

three of them came back because of the poor job economy.

Pellicane finds that like Blaney and Gates-Peters, many students

go to graduate school because they see more career choices.

“A graduate degree is more focused,” Pellicane said. “Students

are going (to graduate school) for a much more specific reason – to

get credentials that will open doors for them.”

Graduate school, however, requires a time commitment and

money.

“For an individual it has to fit with their career goals,”

O’Bruba said. “Grad school is a very serious endeavor and

applicants have to be motivated.”

O’Bruba encourages students to analyze their motivating factors

to attend graduate school.

They should ask themselves is an advanced degree required in the

field? Would a full-time position help confirm the pursuit of

additional education and is it possible to apply to graduate school

and continue looking for employment?

“I would only recommend going to grad school to someone if the

grad work would help make them a better job candidate,”

Gates-Peters said.

Graduate school can possibly even hinder someone from getting a

job in certain fields by making them overqualified, O’Bruba

said.

In certain careers a graduate degree can be helpful in getting a

job, but the reverse can also be true. Having job experience can

help one get into a graduate program. An example of this is that

admission into the master’s program for business requires job

experience.

Students seeking graduate school need to take into account these

factors and also use the resources at hand, O’Bruba said.

“Students need to make an informed decision using all of their

resources,” O’Bruba said

These resources can include the Career Center, career counselors

and databases.

“Think about what you want from life and how grad school fits

in,” O’Bruba said. “Don’t settle for grad school. It should fulfill

a life-long dream, a personal or career goal.”

Possible info box:

Statistics from the Office of Budgets and Institutional

Analysis

Number of graduate applicants by college

Sept 13, 2003 Sept 12, 2003 Change

Overall 5520 5876 +356

Veterinary Med.+Biomedical Sci 289 274 -15

Natural Sciences 1327 1543 +216

Intra-University 217 163 -54

Applied Human Sciences 727 951 +224

Natural Resources 270 271 +1

Engineering 1439 1399 -40

 

Business 349 316 -33

Agricultural Sciences 221 224 +3

Liberal Arts 681 735 +54

Unemployment rates according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics

(www.bls.gov)

1996 5.4 %

1997 4.9 %

1998 4.5 %

1999 4.2 %

2000 4 %

2001 4.7 %

2002 5.8 %

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

Bomb scare evacuates library staff, patrons over break

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Nov 302003
 
Authors: Jason Kosena

A “grenade looking device” was found in a male bathroom on the

second floor of Morgan Library on Tuesday morning, prompting the

evacuation of 100 staff members and six library patrons.

Officers from Fort Collins Police Services, the Larimer County

Sheriff’s Office and the CSU Police Department responded to the

incident.

Police officers responding to a suspicious activity complaint in

the library found a possible explosive device. Two suspects, an

adult male and a juvenile female, were taken into custody, said

Dexter Yarbrough, chief of CSUPD. Neither of the suspects involved

were CSU students or employees.

“Officers found an adult male and juvenile female getting ready

for, or already in the process of, some sort of sexual activity in

a (male) bathroom on the second floor of the library,” Yarbrough

said. “The device was found with them.”

The 28-year-old adult male taken into custody was found to be in

possession of hypodermic needles and an unknown narcotic. Police

are still investigating, but Yarbrough said he believes the male

was in possession of enough drugs to warrant a felony charge.

Police bomb technicians brought the device out of the library

and detonated it to ensure its proper disposal. This minor

explosion caught the attention of some people on campus.

“People were telling me ‘Move back! Move back!'” said Brian

Bouchard, a senior majoring in computer information systems.

“Before I knew it, I was hearing people say ‘Fire in the hole!’ and

then there was an explosion. It was fairly small, but enough to get

everyone riled up.”

The exact material of the possible explosive device will not be

know until further testing can be done. That testing will probably

not be completed until later this week, said Lt. Karl Swenson of

the CSUPD.

According to a press release given by CSUPD, early indications

point to the device not being explosive in nature.

Capt. Bob Chaffee of the CSUPD said the efforts of the

responding officers are commendable and believes this incident is a

one-time event, given the facts police have gathered about the case

thus far.

“I think it was a really coordinated effort. The first officers

on the scene did exactly what needed to be done,” Chaffee said.

“Once we believed it was a possible explosive, the building was

evacuated immediately and the parameter was secured.”

Nate Greeley, a prospective student visiting CSU from Houston,

Texas, saw the morning’s events unfolding as part of his campus

tour.

“I didn’t even know what it was, but (it is) pretty freaky,”

Greeley said.

Despite watching police bomb units, dogs and officers operating

behind the crime scene tape, Greeley said it did not deter him from

wanting to come to CSU.

“It seems police on campus really know what they’re doing. I

feel pretty safe,” he said.

After investigation and a search of the library with a

bomb-sniffing dog, the staff was allowed back in around 10:45 a.m.,

with the entry of library patrons following shortly afterwards.

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

Possible explosion averted

 Uncategorized  Comments Off on Possible explosion averted
Nov 242003
 
Authors: Jason Kosena

A “grenade looking device” was found in a male bathroom on the

second floor of Morgan Library this morning, prompting the response

of officers from the Fort Collins Police Services, the Larimer

County Sheriffs Office and the CSU Police Department.

Police officers responding to a suspicious activity complaint in

the library found a possible explosive device. Two suspects, an

adult male and a juvenile female, were taken into custody,

according to Dexter Yarbrough, chief of the CSU Police

Department.

“Officers found an adult male and juvenile female getting ready

for, or already in the process of, some sort of sexual activity in

a (male) bathroom on the second floor of the library,” Yarbrough

said. “The device was found with them.”

The adult male taken into custody was found to be in possession

of hypodermic needles and an unknown narcotic. Police are still

investigating, but Yarbrough said he believes the male was in

possession of enough drugs to warrant a felony charge.

The library was evacuated once the possible explosive was found.

Police bomb technicians brought the device out of the library and

detonated it to ensure its proper disposal. This minor explosion

caught the attention of some people on campus.

“People were telling me ‘Move back! Move back!'” said Brian

Bouchard, a senior majoring in computer information systems.

“Before I knew it, I was hearing people say ‘fire in the hole!’ and

then there was an explosion. It was fairly small, but enough to get

everyone riled up.”

The exact material of the possible explosive device will not be

know until further testing can be done. That testing will probably

not be completed until next week according to Karl Swenson, a

lieutenant with the CSUPD.

Capt. Bob Chaffee of the CSUPD said the efforts of the

responding officers are commendable and believes this incident is a

one-time event, given the facts police have gathered about the case

thus far.

“I think it was a really coordinated effort. The first officers

on the scene did exactly what needed to be done,” Chaffee said.

“Once we believed it was a possible explosive, the building was

evacuated immediately and the parameter was secured.”

Nate Greeley, a prospective student visiting CSU from Houston

Texas, saw this morning’s events unfolding as part of his campus

tour.

“I didn’t even know what it was, but (it is) pretty freaky,”

Greeley said.

Despite watching police bomb units, dogs and officers operating

behind the crime scene tape, Greeley said this does not deter him

from wanting to come to CSU.

“It seems police on campus really know what they’re doing. I

feel pretty safe.”

After some investigation library staff were allowed back in

around 11 a.m. with students following shortly afterwards.

Collegian reporter Aaron Brachfeld contributed to this

story.

 

 

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

Rams put bowl hopes on table in Vegas

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Nov 202003
 
Authors: Vince Blaser

The CSU football team will play in a high-stakes hand in Las

Vegas Saturday.

Winning the hand against Nevada-Las Vegas (5-5 overall, 1-4

Mountain West Conference) would ensure 10 consecutive winning

seasons and a chance at five consecutive bowl games. Losing the

hand means a team that coach Sonny Lubick described as one of his

most talented groups ever would finish with a .500 record and would

all but send them home for the holidays.

“I’m going to lay it on the line,” said junior tight end Joel

Dreessen. “We’re playing for a bowl game, we’re playing for

ourselves, we’re playing for our teammates, we’re playing because

we owe these punks for last year.”

UNLV’s 36-33 win in Fort Collins last season ruined a perfect

conference record for the Rams and a chance at a top-10 ranking.

Running back Larry Croom ran through the CSU defense all day,

finishing with 20 carries for 222 yards.

CSU will try to shut down Croom and the Rebels with an extremely

thin and hurting linebacker corps. Senior Eric Pauly has been out

since the Utah game Sep. 27, Courtney Jones has been battling a

sore knee the past couple weeks, Jahmal Hall partially tore his

patellar tendon and Drew Wood has a slightly separated shoulder.

Wood should play alongside senior Jeff Flora and sophomore Adam

Lancisero, who will be making his first start for CSU.

“I can deal with the pain,” Wood said. “If you want to play bad

enough, you can deal with it.”

Lubick said depth is a concern if any further injuries occur

during the game. Defensive end Luke Adkins has been practicing at

linebacker this week in case a replacement is needed.

Wood and Lubick both said they have been very impressed with

Lancisero, who transferred from junior college just before the

start of the season.

“I’ve been a little more nervous this week,” Lancisero said. “I

want to get a win for the seniors.”

On offense, wide receiver David Anderson needs 45 receiving

yards to break the CSU single-season record of 1,193 yards set in

1974.

“I honestly have no idea how far away I am from (the record),”

Anderson said. ” I wish it had happened at Hughes.”

Running back Jimmy Green had one of his best games of the season

for the Rams last week against San Diego State, including a 42-yard

burst up the middle in the fourth quarter to make the score 21-6

and end hopes of a Aztecs comeback.

Green said he just stayed patient and kept working hard all

year, hoping for a chance. While senior Rahsaan Sanders should get

the start Saturday, Lubick said Green should get significant

playing time.

“People up here I think didn’t even know I existed,” Green

said.

The Rams face a tough Rebels defense led by strong safety Jamaal

Brimmer, who has 64 tackles, five interceptions and four forced

fumbles on the season. CSU co-offensive coordinator John Benton

said Brimmer is in the top two or three defensive players in the

conference.

“I don’t know if I’ve ever seen a player be responsible for so

many turnovers,” Benton said.

 

 

 

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

Leaving Las Vegas … broke

 Uncategorized  Comments Off on Leaving Las Vegas … broke
Nov 202003
 
Authors: Jon Ackerman

Odds are CSU will go to a bowl game. If the Rams win Saturday,

they should be in like Wynn.

But say they revert to their pitiful Wyoming form, choke in the

regular season finale and defecate on any bowl aspirations. It

pains me to say this, but you know what? I’d be fine with that. In

fact, a small part of me kind of, sort of, secretly, in an

itty-bitty-tiny kind of way, hopes the Rams don’t get a bowl

invite.

Why?

Well, it’s this thing called a bank account. I might not have

one after this weekend. Half the CSU student body might not have

one after this weekend.

We all knew this time was coming. Even though we thought we’d be

making plans for Memphis by now, it’s like someone knew we might

not make a bowl game but wanted us to have fun regardless.

So they scheduled our regular season finale at the University of

Nevada-Las Vegas the exact weekend prior to having a week off from

school. Who can we give thanks to for this gift?

If you’re still in town, get out. Ever been to a Rams’ road

game? Go west, young person. The lights await you. You’ll find a

floor to crash on.

First thing I’m doing when I roll into the City of Sin: throw a

$20 spot on the Rammies, but not the football ones. They’re

six-point favorites. That new Jackson with color is going on men’s

hoops to make the Tourney.

Then I got another $20 on the Denver Donkeys bringing Lombardi

back to the City that John Built. And another on the Nuggets taking

the West.

Man, you see how Vegas works? It eats you up like Siegfried’s

tiger then spits you out like a drop of water in front of the

Bellagio when you’re broke. And you always leave broke.

So here’s a top 10 for you: reasons why Vegas will leave you and

me unable to afford a bowl-game road trip this winter:

10. The buffets. Sure, you can find some for $4.99. But $18.99

is where it’s at.

9. Minimum withdrawal at ATMs is $100.

8. I like Black Jack. I know how to play Black Jack. I will play

Black Jack. Still doesn’t mean I win at Black Jack.

7. The sports books. Any bet, any price, you find the right

casino. Scary. I’m afraid I’m going to have to put another $20 on

Carmelo Anthony winning Rookie of the Year. The way he’s gonna dunk

on LeBron will be unorthodox.

6. Two words: Spearmint Rhino. If you know what this means, you

know what I mean.

5. Par-lay you very much, college football. Paul Schnaitter just

taught me how it works.

4. The craps table … crap.

3. Because the Avalanche is so hot it’s going to melt all this

icccccccce. The Avs and the Cup – another $20.

2. Think Ram Ride will pick me up outside the MGM Grand? Didn’t

think so. Chalk me up for at least four $20 cab rides.

And the No. 1 reason why we’ll all be too broke to go to bowl

game: Last time I was in Vegas, two buddies pressured me into

putting $50 on 18 because a cute girl said that was her favorite

number. That was a dumb bet. But this time, half of CSU will be in

Vegas.

And odds are, cute girls will be aplenty.

It’s gonna be a rough weekend.

 

 

 

 

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

Rams optimistic for season opener

 Uncategorized  Comments Off on Rams optimistic for season opener
Nov 202003
 
Authors: Joelle Milholm

Thanksgiving break will be anything but a break for the CSU

women’s basketball team. Not only will Rams open their season

tonight against Texas Southern, but they will also play at Stephen

F. Austin in Nachogdoches, Texas, on Monday and host the Coors

Rocky Mountain Invitational Nov. 28 to 29.

The team, however, is anxious to play a meaningful game.

“Finally, we get sick of practicing and we are ready to play

games,” said sophomore point guard Vanessa Espinoza.

The Rams started the preseason with an 84-64 win over Sparta

Praha of the Czech Republic and ended it with a commanding 73-35

win over University of Colorado-Colorado Springs. After those two

exhibition wins, the Rams believe they are ready for the regular

season.

“We have been practicing hard and working on rebounding and

taking good shots,” senior forward Joy Jenkins said. “That is

something we did not do so well in our last game and we need to

work on knocking down some shots.”

The Rams will open the season against Texas Southern tonight for

the teams’ first meeting in school history. Texas Southern finished

last season with a 5-22 record, but like CSU began the preseason

with two exhibition wins.

“They are athletic and we are going to have to go out there and

play hard,” Jenkins said. “We have to play our style and not

theirs.”

CSU has victories in its last three season openers and has won

three straight home openers. With the game at Moby Arena, the Rams

will have the opportunity to extend their home winning streak to 17

games.

After the home opener, the Rams will head to Texas to play

Stephen F. Austin. The Ladyjacks ended last season with a 15-13

record and have a 1-1 record all-time against CSU. In their most

recent meeting, the Rams beat the Ladyjacks 85-62 at Moby Arena.

Stephen F. Austin has also won its first two exhibition games but

will play No. 12 Louisiana Tech tonight before facing the Rams.

CSU will wrap up the holiday break by hosting the Coors Rocky

Mountain Invitational. The Rams will play Long Beach State in the

first game on Nov. 28 and the championship and consolation games

will take place on Nov. 29. The Rams hope to start the season on

the right foot and expect to play well.

“We have really high expectations. We want to come out from

tip-off and set the tone,” Espinoza said. “We are going to play

pressure defense and take care of the ball, which I think we have

done really well so far. We also want to have good rebounding,

offensively and defensively. That wins games.”

 

 

 

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

Nationals preview

 Uncategorized  Comments Off on Nationals preview
Nov 202003
 
Authors: Joshua Pilkington

In a scene that would make the creators of Ephedra jealous,

hundreds of the best distance runners from around the nation will

gather at Irv Warren Memorial Golf Course to compete in the NCAA

Cross Country Championships Monday.

Thirty-eight women’s teams and 31 men’s teams, composed of seven

runners each, make up the field in Cedar Falls, Iowa, and among

them will be the seven men and women who represent the CSU

Rams.

After failing to qualify last season for the national meet, the

women’s team returns on the strength of a deep roster.

“There isn’t one person that stands out more than the rest,”

said junior Michelle Carmen. “Any one of us can finish first on any

day.”

Indeed. In their past four meets, the Rams have had a different

woman lead the team across the finish line in three of them.

Sophomore transfer Nicole Feest, senior Katie Yemm and junior

Crystal Clark have been top finishers for the Rams this season.

Yemm, a top runner for CSU since arriving in 1999, suffered a

setback last weekend in Ogden, Utah, at the Mountain Regional meet,

yet the Rams still finished third to nationally ranked Brigham

Young (No. 1) and Colorado (No. 7), a further testament to the

women’s depth.

Their third-place finish in the Mountain Region pushed the Rams’

women from No. 22 to No. 16 in the national polls and head coach

Del Hessel said he believes a top-10 finish is within reach for

both teams.

The top spot in the women’s 6-kilometer race should come down to

the defending-champion Cougars and the Cardinal of Stanford. Both

teams boast a wealth of fast, determined runners, but BYU’s women’s

head coach Patrick Shane said his team has hit its stride.

“We are starting to peak and it looks like we will be back in

the zone again this year,” he said. “We are used to the pressure

that going to a National Championship brings. We have learned to

deflect that pressure and just plan on repeating that.”

For the men the task to finish strong falls on the shoulders on

the team’s top four runners: senior Austin Vigil, juniors Bill

Michel and Mike Nicks and sophomore Josh Glaab.

After Hessel pulled him from the Mountain West Conference

Championship meet after three miles due to fatigue issues, Nicks

bounced back at Regionals to finish 21st overall and third on the

team.

Hessel said his presence on the team is essential, especially if

the Rams hope to improve on last season’s 27th-place finish.

Freshman Matt Ciancuilli helped solidify a previously

inconsistent fifth spot after finishing 32nd overall at Regionals.

Another strong performance from him could push the Rams’ men to a

top-10 finish.

Another factor pushing the Rams is the presence of two other MWC

competitors. Both Air Force (No. 8) and BYU (No. 11) have narrowly

defeated the 16th-ranked Rams in consecutive meets, leaving the CSU

eager to prove it is the better team.

The overall team title should come down to a battle between No.

1 Stanford, No. 2 Wisconsin and No. 3 Colorado, while the

individual crown could go to several men, most notably among them

Dathan Ritzenheim of CU and Kip Kangogo of BYU.

Ritzenheim and Kangogo finished first and second, respectively

at Regionals and BYU men’s head coach Ed Eyestone said he expects a

similar battle at Nationals.

“I expect Kip to perform much better at Nationals,” Eyestone

said. “I expect Kip and Ritzenheim to go tooth and nail at

Nationals.”

The gun for the men’s 10k goes off at 11 a.m. (Central) and at

12:15 p.m. for the women’s 6k.

 

 

 

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

CSU capsules

 Uncategorized  Comments Off on CSU capsules
Nov 202003
 
Authors: Vince Blaser

Passing:

CSU: Quarterback Bradlee Van Pelt leads the MWC in total yards

and is second in passing. Guard Albert Bimper is doubtful to play

for the second straight week after suffering a shoulder and neck

injury. Wide receiver David Anderson needs 45 yards to break the

CSU single-season record for receiving yards.

UNLV: The Rebels were shut out for the first time since 1999 two

weeks ago in a 7-0 loss to San Diego State. Quarterback Kurt

Nanktes was ineffective with an injured groin and was lifted for

true freshman Shane Steichen.

Advantage: Rams

Rushing:

CSU: Running back Jimmy Green’s 46-yard touchdown run against

SDSU should give him significant playing time. Senior Rahsaan

Sanders should start. The Rams’ most effective rusher is Van Pelt,

who has run for 778 yards this season.

UNLV: Running back Larry Croom ran all over CSU for 222 yards

last season. However, he has only run for more than 100 yards once

since suffering an injury against Kansas early in the season.

Advantage: Even

Defense:

CSU: The Rams are hurting at the linebacker. Jahmal Hall and

Eric Pauly are out, and Courtney Jones may not play. Drew Wood will

play on a separated shoulder and Adam Lancicero will get his first

start. The Rams had their best defensive performance against SDSU,

giving up six points and scoring on a Ben Stratton

interception.

UNLV: Strong safety Jamaal Brimmer has nine turnovers, including

five interceptions. UNLV has only allowed two 100-yard rushers this

season. But the Rebels have the worst passing defense in the MWC,

giving up 229 yards passing per game.

Advantage: Even

Special Teams

CSU: Dexter Wynn is second in the MWC in punt returns, averaging

11.5 yards per return. Kicker Jeff Babcock has been up and down

with field goals, but is 8-for-8 on the road this season. He

averages 42 yards per punt.

UNLV: The Rebels are 14th in the nation in punt returns but

115th in kickoff returns. Punter Gary Cook’s 43.5-yard average per

punt is 16th in the nation. Kicker Dillon Pieffer is 15-for-19 on

field goals this season.

Advantage: Rams

Our Pick: Rams 31, UNLV 14

 

 

 

 Posted by at 5:00 pm