To the Editor:

 Uncategorized
Oct 052003
 
Authors:

I am responding to Jon Ackerman’s article in the Oct. 3 issue of the Collegian, “Note to Utah.”

I firmly believe that researching the whole story before deciding to bash someone for no apparent reason is a foundation of good journalism. This is in reference to Ackerman’s comments about Tau Kappa Epsilon’s alumni and active softball teams. Last time I checked, the tournament was called “Frats at Bat” not “Fraternity Active Members Only at Bat.” As I am sure, we were not the only team with alumni members playing. I can say however, we were the only team that asked the ladies of Delta Delta Delta if an alumni team would be appropriate. Our alumni only wanted to help out the charity and have a fun weekend with their active brothers.

The real story that Ackerman forgot to mention is that he is a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon, which lost a hard fought game against the TKE alumni team 28-21 (hardly a blowout).

Instead of going after our active members because a bunch of 25- to 30-year-old out-of-shape men won a softball game, do the right thing and give a real shout out to the ladies of Delta Delta Delta, who with their annual “Frats at Bat” raised over $6,000 for Children’s Cancer Charities. If winning this event is the primary concern, then our alumni team can sit out next year and Delta Delta Delta’s philanthropy can forfeit our donation. If there is anything else that the alumni of Tau Kappa Epsilon can do to improve the community or improve the sportsmanship of Mr. Ackerman, please let us know.

Sincerely,

Neal Bozeman

TKE Alumnus

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

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To the Editor:

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Oct 052003
 
Authors:

I am writing in response to the article and editorial piece regarding outside vendors on campus. CSU is currently dealing with major budget cuts. It is my understanding that CSU President Larry Penley is seeking ways to supplement our funds through the private sector. I would challenge the university to explore the potential revenue gain that could be generated by outside food vendors. Common sense would say that an increase in food diversity would entice more students to eat on campus, thereby funneling the money to CSU instead of it flowing to the greater Fort Collins.

Consequently, since there is a class dedicated to this issue I would challenge that class to do some survey research to see if my previous assertion is correct. If the research shows that more students would stay on campus, then CSU should initiate a Request For Proposal process for outside vendors. The outside vendors should be expected to give a percentage of their sales in accordance with the university’s standards. I am all for what is in the best interest of the student body, and right now that seems to revolve around our school’s budget.

I urge the university to please consider the possibility that outside vendors could benefit Colorado State as a whole.

Brandon Amato

Senior, social work

 Posted by at 5:00 pm

To the Editor

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Oct 052003
 
Authors:

The current health frenzy in the United States centers on smoking and the resulting second-hand smoke.

Point one of the argument goes that innocent people’s health should be protected by the law from second-hand smoke. I agree, but activists and laws have gone too far.

Point two: the majority has passed excise tax laws to educate people about the dangers of smoking. The first problem with these “sin taxes” is that some of the money is diverted to other things where the “righteous” receive services without paying for them. The second problem is that the rising costs for tobacco creates the incentive to break an unjust law. The Canadians are ahead of the United States on the excise tax game and have created a billion dollar a year smuggling activity, mostly by border crossing smokers.

Point three is a warped justification of “protecting the innocent” where the majority is recreating the “Health Police” of the United States by passing into law their “righteous values” to “save” the “sinning minority” from themselves. The United States had first entered the Health Police business by passing the 18th Constitutional Amendment — the prohibition of intoxicating liquor, ratified in 1919. The demand was high and organized crime built their Empires of Vise that haunt us to this day. The 21st Amendment repealed Prohibition in 1933 but the Department of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms exists. This anti-smoking frenzy is the stupidest meddling in people’s lives since Prohibition. We should stop Big Brother practices.

S. J. Slaton

Fort Collins resident

 Posted by at 5:00 pm